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Hot Air Balloon Heights (page 2)

based on 98 ratings
Author: Josh M.

Results

I tested the bigger bag first and each time it rose almost to the top of my ceiling (about 3 meters) as the bags got smaller, they didn't rise as high as the first bigger bag, the smaller the bag the less it rose.

Attempts
BAG LENGTH
FLIGHT 1
FLIGHT 2
FLIGHT 3
73.6 CM
3M
3.5M
3.35M
63.5 CM
2.1M
1.67M
1.82M
43.18 CM
.76M
.91M
.91M
27.94 CM
.60M
.60M
.60M
 

This graph below shows what happened with each balloon (bag) at each test.

Conclusion

In conclusion my hypothesis was correct. When i tested the biggest bag with the toaster as the heat source it rose the highest. Each time we tested a smaller bag it did not elevate as high as the first biggest bag. Next time, I would like to test what would happen if we changed the setting on the toaster to a higher degree or test different heat sources to see which bag would stay in the air the longest.

Bibliography

  • "All About Hot Air Balloons" 2006-2011 www.hotairbaloons.com
  • Bilbrey, Jim. Interviewed by Joshua Mora. Wildomar, CA: February 4, 2011
  • Bristow, David l. The Sky Sailors: True Stories of the Balloon Era New York, New York Farrar Straus Giroux 2010
  • Coombs, Charles Hot Air Ballooning New York, W. Marrow 1981
  • Genevieve Thiers "The History of the Hot Air Balloon" 2002 www.essortment.com/hotairballoon
  • Kenneth Lafferty Hess Family "Free Science Project Ideas, Answers and Tools for Serious Students" 1-17-11 
  • www.sciencebuddies.org/mentoring/recommender-resusults
  • Priceman, Marjorie Hot Air New York, New York Atheneum Books for Young Readers 2005

 

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