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Physical Science Projects & Project Ideas

Our team of professional scientists, science teachers and educational consultants has put together an excellent collection of free physical science projects for kids. These include physics science fair projects, science experiments, and demonstrations that help kids explore the world of classical mechanics, as well as other great physical science topics: our hair-raising magnet and electricity experiments are sure to spark your child's scientific curiosity. Whether you’re looking for science fair project ideas for your child’s upcoming science fair or your little one simply loves conducting physical science experiments, Education.com’s physical science section is a fantastic free resource.

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Marshmallows are made of sugar, water, and air pockets.  Since the marshmallow is flexible, will air pressure cause it to expand when heated in a microwave?
Physical Science
Elementary School
Compare air temperature with the infrared temperature from a reflecting surface at different times of the day, in shade and in sunlight.
Physical Science
Middle School
In this physics project, learn about the relationship between light intensity and distance  using a laser pointer, flashlight, and graph paper!
Physics
Third Grade
With this cool floating rocks project, your child will get some hands-on experience with buoyancy and learn why certain rocks like pumice are able to float.
Physics
First Grade
Science fair project which teaches you about the principles of physics within a vacuum by creating a vacuum chamber.
Physics
Fifth Grade
This science fair project what causes a soda eruption and what kinds of candy create this effect?
Chemistry
Elementary School
Which public places harbor the most bacteria and germs? Test different environments to find out where the most bacteria live in this science project.
Chemistry
Seventh Grade
Is temperature a requirement for solar energy uses? This project tests this theory and examines the amount of usable sunlight for solar-energy applications.
Physics
Middle School
What is the coldest temperature possible? In this cool experiment, you'll calculate absolute zero by extrapolating data on the temperature and volume of gas.
Physics
Tenth Grade
Kids will learn some cool stuff about chemical reactions by determining what happens when you mix different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and yeast.
Chemistry
Third Grade

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