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Punctuation Grammar Rules: Grammar ReviewPractice Exercises (page 2)

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Updated on Aug 25, 2011

Practice Exercise: Apostrophes

See if you can find all of the apostrophe mistakes in these sentences. You can check your answers at the end of the exercises.

  1. I do'nt believe Iv'e ever seen a five-toed cat before, have you?
  2. Miss Marples' detective skills are as clever as Sherlock Holmes's flair for solving crimes.
  3. These childrens picture book's have become too easy for you. Lets choose a more challenging book to read this time.
  4. Werent you at my sister Tracys' birthday party two week's ago?
  5. I heard that your fathers got two sports cars!

Practice Exercise: Identify Mistakes

Can you identify the mistakes in the following sentences? You may check your answers at the end of the exercises.

  1. The vice president elect spoke briefly about the president.
  2. The Gary Paulsen novel Brian's Winter, a story of survival in the Canadian wilderness, would make a good G rated movie for kids.
  3. Some ski resorts use gondolas and Tbars to transport skiers to the top of the mountain.
  4. Twenty two is my lucky number. What's yours?
  5. Louisa May Alcott 1832–1888 was thirty five when she wrote Little Women.

Answers

Reminder: (1) Periods signify the end of declarative and imperative sentences, (2) question marks are used after a question, and (3) exclamations signify strong feelings or emotion.

  1. The sun was shining in my window when I woke up.
  2. Did you see the tightrope walker at the circus?
  3. The honest stranger found a wallet and returned it to its owner.
  4. Ouch! That hurt!
  5. Excellent work class. I am very proud of you!

Reminder: Use commas (1) to separate series of three or more items in a sentence, (2) with an introductory word or phrase, and (3) before and after a word or phrase that is meant to rename or describe a noun that precedes it (an appositive).

  1. Sal's uncle, Joe, is a mail carrier in Mississippi.
  2. Believe it or not, Joe walks about five miles a day on his route.
  3. Last month, he was chased by a neighborhood dog, Rex, while working on his route.
  4. Fortunately, he was able to run, jump a fence, and hop into his truck for safety.
  5. Joe's customer, Mr. Henderson, was careful to keep Rex inside from then on.

Reminder: Also use commas (1) in dates and addresses, (2) to set off expressions, and (3) with titles and degrees.

  1. Mr. Eatmore S. Pinach, president of the Ban Brussels Sprouts Association (BBSA), is heading a worldwide protest against the sale and consumption of the so-called "wild cabbage."
  2. It seems its popularity has soared to new heights since the latest campaign, The Brussels Sprout Tout, has gone on tour throughout Europe, Asia, and North America.
  3. The operation has prompted many widespread international anti-sprout movements among dark, leafy greens lovers, led by China's Bok Choy, Switzerland's Swiss Chard, and North America's renown Dan D. Lyon Green.
  4. Donations to support the cause are greatly appreciated, so please feel free to give your time or money generously.
  5. Send all correspondence and contributions to BBSA, 481 Bountiful Blvd., Verdant Valley, CA, 98765.

Reminder: Use colons to (1) introduce a list, (2) introduce the subtitle of a movie or book, and (3) separate hours from minutes when writing the time. Use a semicolon (4) to separate two related sentences and (5) between two complete sentences that are separated by transitional words or phrases.

  1. Mom's list included the following: milk, eggs, butter, toothpaste, and soap.
  2. I was supposed to be home at 11:30 A.M., but I got home at 1:30 P.M. instead.
  3. Pratishta couldn't decide whether to watch Ace Ventura: Pet Detective or Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves.
  4. The weather on Sunday was spectacular; however, we had to stay home to paint.
  5. His new baby sister was precious; her blue eyes were riveting.

Reminder: (1) Direct quotations require the use of opening and ending quotation marks; (2) don't place quote around someone's thoughts; and (3) use quotes to convey uncertainty or misgivings.

  1. "Remember, class," said Mr. McDermott, "tomorrow is Spirit Day, so wear green!"
  2. I don't think I have anything green, thought Julie. I wonder if Kevin will let me borrow his football jersey.
  3. "This will be the third thing you've borrowed from me this week!" Kevin said to Julie. "Including the jersey, you have to make sure you return my CD and my yearbook."
  4. Smiling, Julie replied, "I'll go get your yearbook and CD right now. I wanted to show Carol a picture of Mike Wiley, a boy she likes."
  5. "Uh, that's more information than I needed to know, Jules. Just go get my stuff," jibed Kevin, on his way out the door.

Reminder: (1) Contractions are two words shortened or squeezed together with an apostrophe; (2) to make a singular noun possessive, add an 's; (3) to make a plural noun ending in s possessive, add an apostrophe AFTER the final s; (4) to make a singular noun ending in s possessive, add an 's OR add an apostrophe after the s; (5) when writing abbreviations with more than one period, add an 's to denote more than to make it plural.

  1. I don't believe I've ever seen a five-toed cat before, have you?
  2. Miss Marple's detective skills are as clever as Sherlock Holmes' (or Holmes's) flair for solving crimes.
  3. These children's picture books have become too easy for you. Let's choose a more challenging book to read this time.
  4. Weren't you at my sister Tracy's birthday party two weeks ago?
  5. I heard that your father's got two sports cars!

Reminder: Use hyphens (1) with some prefixes, (2) to join capital letters to form a new word, (3) to write numbers 21–99 in word form or as a date. Also, (4) dates and page numbers can be placed inside parentheses, and (5) italicize or underline the titles of long works, like books.

  1. The vice president-elect spoke briefly about the president.
  2. The Gary Paulsen novel Brian's Winter, a story of survival in the Canadian wilderness, would make a good G-rated movie for kids. (Brian's Winter may also be italicized.)
  3. Some ski resorts use gondolas and T-bars to transport skiers to the top of the mountain.
  4. Twenty-two is my lucky number. What's yours?
  5. Louisa May Alcott (1832—1888) was thirty-five when she wrote Little Women.
  6. (Little Women may also be italicized.)

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