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Types of Critical Thinking Exams Study Guide (page 2)

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Updated on Sep 20, 2011

Roadblocks to Critical Reading Question Success

  1. U sing prior information. Every answer comes from a reading selection, whether it appears directly or can be inferred. If you have prior knowledge of the subject, don't use it. Adding information, even if it makes sense to you to do so, can lead you to the wrong answer.
  2. Choosing an answer just because it is true. There may be a couple of true answers, but only one will answer the question best.

ACT

The ACT consists of four separate tests: English, reading, math, and science. The reading test is similar to the SAT Critical Reading Test; it consists of passages followed by questions that relate to them. The science test also involves critical-thinking skills. It is designed as a reasoning test, rather than an assessment of your science knowledge. As with the critical reading tests, you are given in the passages all the information you need to know to answer the questions. (However, the ACT website does note that "background knowledge acquired in general, introductory science courses is needed to answer some of the questions.")

What You Will Find on the Test

The ACT Science Reasoning Test contains 40 questions covering biology, chemistry, physics, and Earth/space sciences, including geology, astronomy, and meteorology. The questions measure interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning, and problem-solving skills. There are seven passages that present scientific information in one of three formats: data representation (graphs, tables, etc.), research summaries, or conflicting viewpoints (several related but inconsistent hypotheses or views). Each passage is followed by a number of multiple-choice questions that ask you to interpret, evaluate, analyze, draw conclusions, and make predictions about the information. Here, "passages" may include both text and graphics, like figures, charts, diagrams, tables, or any combination of these.

Specifically, you will be asked to:
  • read and understand scatter plots, graphs, tables, diagrams, charts, figures, etc.
  • interpret scatter plots, graphs, tables, diagrams, charts, figures, etc.
  • compare and interpret information presented in graphics
  • draw conclusions about the information provided
  • make predictions about the data
  • develop hypotheses based on the data

Using Study Guides to Prepare for the Exam

  • Recognizing and Defining Problems: Recognizing a Problem Study Guide and Defining a Problem Study Guide. These lessons will help you to zero in on the precise problems presented in Conflicting Viewpoint passages.
  • Focused Observation: Increased Awareness Study Guide. Knowing how to concentrate and approach a problem thoroughly is critical, because not only are you expected to arrive at the correct answer, but you must record it in a relatively short period.
  • Graphic Organizers: Brainstorming Graphic Organizers Study Guide. Understanding how information fits into charts, maps, and outlines will help you to make sense of, and draw conclusions about, them.
  • Persuasion Techniques: Persuasion Techniques Study Guide. This lesson will be most useful when dealing with Conflicting Viewpoints. It explains how persuasive arguments work. Having this knowledge will help you to be better able to analyze conflicting viewpoints.
  • The Numbers Game: Manipulating Statistics Study Guide. You will gain an understanding of how numbers are used and misused. Many questions are designed to evaluate how good your skills in this area are.
  • Deductive and Inductive Reasoning: Deductive Reasoning Study Guide and Inductive Reasoning Study Guide. These lessons cover the structure of logical arguments, which help you draw conclusions, and, with inductive logic, the development of hypotheses.
  • Judgment Calls: Making Judgment Call Study Guide. Any time you make an inference, you are testing your ability to make sound judgment calls. This lesson will also help you to evaluate the consequences of possible solutions.
  • Explanations: Argument vs. Explanation Study Guide. In this lesson, you discovered what makes a valid, sound explanation. On tests, you're often asked to choose the best answer out of four. With what you've learned, you'll be able to pick the right answer.

Tip

Always read all directions carefully and read all the answers before choosing one. Answer the easy questions first. And don't change an answer unless you're sure it's wrong; your first guess is most often right.

GRE (Graduate Record Examinations) General Test

The GRE General Test assesses knowledge and skills needed for graduate study. There are four parts: verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking, and analytical writing skills not related to any specific field of study. The verbal section is similar to the critical reading on the SAT. You're asked to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information in passages you read.

What You Will Find on the Test

The GRE analytical writing section differs from both the SAT and ACT in that there are no multiple-choice questions. Instead, your critical-thinking skills are tested as you examine claims and evidence, support ideas with relevant reasons and examples, and keep up a rational, well-focused discussion. Answers are judged on how well you:

  • consider the complexities and implications of the issue
  • organize, develop, and express your ideas on the issue
  • identify and analyze important features of the argument
  • organize, develop, and express your critique of the argument
  • support your ideas with relevant reasons and examples
  • control the elements of standard written English

The Issue section provides two opinions on topics of general interest. You must select one and then respond to it from any perspective. Your response must be supported with sound explanations, evidence, and examples. In the next section, you are given an argument to analyze. Rather than giving your opinion on the subject, you must explain how the argument is either logically sound or not.

Using Study Guides to Prepare for the Test

  • Recognizing and Defining Problems: Recognizing a Problem Study Guide and Defining a Problem Study Guide. These lessons will help you to zero in on the precise problems you will discuss in both the opinion and argument sections. It is especially important that you can make the distinction between a problem and its symptoms or consequences.
  • Focused Observation: Increased Observation Study Guide. Knowing how to gather information is critical, because you must back up your opinion or critique with relevant examples and reasoning.
  • Fact and Opinion: Fact or Opinion Study Guide. You won't have access to research materials while taking the GRE, but you can think critically about the documentation of sources and credentials. If the author of the argument you must analyze cites facts and figures without documentation, that is an important point for you to make.
  • Persuasion Techniques: Persuasion Techniques Study Guide. This lesson teaches you how to recognize and describe persuasion techniques. You will learn the names of the rhetorical devices used in persuasive writing, and how they work. The use of these correct terms will improve the quality of your responses.
  • The Numbers Game: Manipulating Statistics Study Guide.  Surveys, studies, and statistics may be used in the argument you must analyze. Knowing how to judge the validity of such facts will help you to construct a strong response (see the following sample argument and response for a specific example).
  • Deductive and Inductive Reasoning: Deductive Reasoning Study Guide and Inductive Reasoning Study Guide.  These lessons cover the structure of logical arguments. You need a thorough understanding of reasoning to be able to identify and analyze the important features of the argument you are given.
  • Explanations: Argument vs. Explanation Study Guide. There are no "correct" answers on the GRE Analytical Writing Test. Whatever view or critique you decide to write about, you will need to explain yourself using evidence and examples. This lesson teaches you how to recognize and construct sound explanations.
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