Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus

Drawing Conclusions Study Guide

based on 9 ratings
By
Updated on Sep 29, 2011

Drawing Conclusions

In this lesson, you'll discover that you use clues from the text, plus any inferences you've made, to draw a conclusion about what's true and what isn't.

AFTER YOU MAKE one or more inferences, you can draw a conclusion—a decision based on facts and inferences. Drawing a conclusion is kind of like solving a mystery. You put together clues, or facts, from the text and all the inferences you made as you read it. Then you decide what's true. But be careful: Sometimes readers "jump to conclusions," or make decisions, before they have all the facts

Example 1

Bo heard a classmate say she's going to Rome on summer vacation. He knows there's a famous city named Rome in Italy. So Bo sighs and says to a friend, "Dad says the price of gas is so high that we can't go away this summer. I wish I were going someplace really interesting . . . like Italy!"

Did Bo have enough information to draw that conclusion? No, he could infer that she meant Italy, but his inference was wrong. He jumped to that conclusion before he had all the facts. Imagine his surprise when he later finds out the girl always spends summers in Rome, Ohio!

Now, imagine you're the person in this story. What inferences can you make? What conclusion can you draw when you have all the facts?

Example 2

I couldn't believe it! I was set to go home and reached for my new jacket. But it was gone! I hunted for it everywhere around my locker. Suddenly I saw this kid walking out of school wearing a jacket just like mine! "Hey!" I yelled, "Wait up!"

Could you infer that the other kid took your missing jacket? Yes, but you be wrong and would be jumping to a conclusion. You need to ask questions and maybe examine the jacket. You do, and discover it looks like yours, but it's not. But you can conclude that the other kid has really good fashion sense, like you!

Practice exercises for this study guide can be found at:

Drawing Conclusions Practice Exercises

Add your own comment