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Fiction or Nonfiction Practice Exercises

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Updated on Sep 29, 2011

Review the following study guide if needed:

Fiction or Nonfiction Study Guide

Fiction or Nonfiction Practice Exercises

Practice 1: Their Eyes Were on the Skies 

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) As young boys, Wilbur (1867–1912) and Orville (1871–1948) Wright sold homemade mechanical toys. In their twenties, the boys made bikes. And in their thirties, they built their own flying machines.
(2) The Wrights' flying began with gliders. They tested wind-gliders near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, where breezes were most favorable. But the gliders didn't have quite enough lifting power, so the boys went back to the drawing board. They built a 6-foot (1.8 m) wind tunnel where they tested new wing designs. After building and flying almost 1,000 gliders, they found the right design, then moved on to create a motor-driven aircraft.
(3) In 1903, Wilbur and Orville spent less than $1,000 to build Flyer 1, a gasolinepowered plane. Its wings were 40 feet (12 m) across, and with a pilot aboard, weighed about 750 pounds (340 kg). On December 17, Orville flew Flyer 1 120 feet (37 m) for 12 seconds. Later that day, Wilbur flew it 852 feet (260 m) and was airborne for 59 seconds. The age of flight had arrived.
1. You can tell this is nonfiction because
a. it has imaginary characters.
b. it has facts about real people and events.
c. it has dialogue for actors to speak.
d. it has rhythm and some words rhyme.
2. You would most likely find this kind of writing in a
a. fairytale.
b. newspaper.
c. history textbook.
d. science fiction story.
3. My brother Orville and I grew up in Dayton, Ohio. We were always interested in mechanical things, long before we built the first motor-driven plane. If an author wrote this, you would most likely find it
a. in a biography.
b. in an autobiography.
c. in a play.
d. in an encyclopedia.

Practice 2: A Helping Hand - or Teeth! 

Based on a story by Aesop

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

      SCENE 1 [forest area; enter Mouse]
      MOUSE: I'm famished! I'll just look for some tasty seeds to eat. [exit]
      LION: [enter] Umm! That was a gr-r-reat breakfast! [yawn] But now I'm exhausted. I think I'll take a nap. [lies down and snores softly]
      SCENE 1 [enter Mouse; doesn't see Lion and bumps into him]
      LION: Wh-Wh-What? [grabs Mouse] Well, what have we here?
      MOUSE: Oh, great Lion, please don't hurt me. Please, let me go.
      LION: Why should I, Mouse? You'd make a yummy little snack!
      MOUSE: But someday you may need my help!
      LION: Ha-ha, ha-ha! What a laugh! You help me? What could a silly, scared little mouse do to help a strong, brave lion like me?
      MOUSE: I don't know, but this gianormous forest is full of danger. And small animals can help bigger ones. I'm sure of it!
      LION: [laughs] You're lucky, Mouse. I'm feeling generous today, so I'll let you go. Besides, I really shouldn't eat between meals!
      MOUSE: Oh, thank you, great Lion. You won't be sorry! [exit]
      LION: What a silly little mouse. Imagine a lion needing the help of a mouse! Ha-ha-ha! [exit]
      SCENE 3 [Enter Lion, roaring and tangled in a net]
      LION: ROAR! Oh, no! I'm caught in this hunter's net! What'll I do? ROAR!
      MOUSE: [enter] What's that noise? Oh, there's someone caught in that net. Wait! I recognize that voice! [crosses to Lion] You're the lion that let me go! It looks like you could use some help. Don't worry, I'll get you out.
      LION: But what can you do to help?
      MOUSE: I'll chew through the ropes with my sharp teeth. [chews rope]
      LION: Chew away, little Mouse, chew away! I was wrong; a little animal can help a big animal. I'm sorry I laughed at you.
      MOUSE: There! That hole's big enough, now crawl out of the net, Lion.
      LION: I'm free! Thank you, little Mouse, thank you. You saved my life!
      MOUSE: That's okay, Lion. I'm glad I could help. After all, you saved my life once, remember? But listen … I hear the hunters coming.
      LION: Let's get out of here…my friend! [Exit Lion and Mouse]
4. You know this selection is fiction because it
a. has facts about a forest.
b. has imaginary talking animals.
c. has a net and there are real net traps.
d. is very short.
5. You can identify this selection as a play because it
a. has stanzas.
b. is a personal story about real events.
c. includes facts and statistics about mice.
d. gives dialogue and directions for actors.
6. Which is the most likely moral, or lesson, of this fable?
a. Don't count your chickens before they're hatched.
b. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
c. Kindness given will be kindness repaid.
d. Don't put off until tomorrow what you can do today.
7. This play is divided into sections or
a. scenes.
b. acts.
c. stanzas.
d. locations.
8. The information in square brackets [ ] are
a. to be spoken by the actors.
b. facts to tell the audience.
c. directions for the actors to follow.
d. all of the above
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