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Paragraph Development Practice Exercises 1 (page 3)

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Updated on Sep 28, 2011

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  1. a.   This is the best choice because it is the only one that refers to recycling containers, which is the main focus of this paragraph. The other choices are statements about recycling in general.
  2. b.   This is the only choice that mentions telecommuting, which is the main focus of this paragraph. The other choices are too general.
  3. c.   This choice refers to "unreasonable searches," which is the main focus of this paragraph. Choice a can be ruled out because this idea is not developed by the other two sentences. Choices b and d do not relate to the topic of unreasonable searches.
  4. b.   This choice clearly fits with the main focus of the paragraph, which is the skill that is needed to hand-rear orphaned baby birds. Choice a is too vague to be a topic sentence. Choices c and d introduce other topics.
  5. c.   The main focus of the paragraph is the height of a wave. This is the only choice that introduces that topic.
  6. a.   The paragraph expresses the writer's opinion about respect for the law. Choices b and d can be ruled out because they are irrelevant to the main topic. Choice c can also be eliminated because it discusses respect for other people, not respect for the law.
  7. b.   Choice b addresses both of Gary's vanities: his person and his situation. Choice a deals only with Gary's vanity of person. Choice c deals only with his vanity of position. Choice d is not supported in the passage.
  8. d.   The use of phrases like changed the course of history and nations have actually gone to war implies that the subject of the paragraph is history; these phrases also connote danger and intrigue.
  9. a.   This sentence introduces the topic of painting models and miniatures. The other sentences provide supporting ideas, but not the main topic.
  10. b.   Each sentence may be true, but only choice b introduces the specific farm that the paragraph discusses. The paragraph is about Wheeler Farm, not about Silas Wheeler.
  11. b.   The paragraph addresses the dangerous nature of power mowers, and only choice b introduces that topic.
  12. a.   The paragraph addresses changes in the company's vacation policy, and choice a introduces that topic. Choices b and c are addressed in the paragraph, but neither refers to the overall topic.
  13. d.   This choice specifically defines the kind of hearsay evidence that is admissible in a trial and would be logically followed by a definition of the kind of hearsay evidence that is inadmissible. It works better as a topic sentence than choice c, which is more general. Choices a and b contradict the rest of the paragraph.
  14. c.   Choice c is the only choice that prepares the reader for the fact that the paragraph constitutes a set of instructions for workers.
  15. d.   Choice d is the only sentence that focuses on both the tickler system and its usefulness to secretaries, and therefore is relevant to all the other sentences in the paragraph. Choices a and b are too general to effectively focus the paragraph; choice c is too narrow.
  16. c.   This choice focuses most sharply on the main topic of the paragraph—muscle atrophy and bone loss. Choices a and b are too broad to guide the reader to the focus of the paragraph. Choice d is too limited.
  17. a.   The word rather indicates a contrast to whatever came before. Choice a is the only sentence that guides the reader to the contrast between the old definition of asthma and the new. Choices b and c are less precisely related to the new understanding of asthma. Choice d is not related at all.
  18. a.   Choice a is more specific than the other choices and more sharply focused toward the entire paragraph. Choices b and d are more vague and general, and choice c is written in a slightly different, more upbeat style.
  19. a.   Choice a expands on the topic sentence. Choices b and c do not relate directly to indoor pollution. The style of choice d is more informal than that of the topic sentence.
  20. c.   This choice directly illustrates the topic sentence. Choice a does not mention the Middle Ages, choice b does not mention red hair, and choice d is unrelated to the topic sentence.
  21. a.   The topic of this paragraph is weed killer, not weeds; nor is proper care addressed.
  22. c.   The idea expressed in the topic sentence is counterintuitive, as stated in choice c. (The words This idea also gives an important clue, since an idea is the subject of the topic sentence.) The other choices do not relate directly to the nature of light.
  23. b.   The topic is Internet communication, not computers. Choice c does address communication, but not as it relates to the Internet.
  24. c.   Choice c expands on the list of good reasons to eat organic food. The other choices are simply neutral facts.
  25. d.   Choice helps explode the myth spoken of in the topic sentence by giving alternatives to student loans. The other choices do not deal directly with the idea expressed in the topic sentence.
  26. b.   The topic sentence is obviously from a contract and speaks of an agreement. Choice b goes on to explain, in the language of a contract, what that agreement is and so is more closely related to the topic sentence than the other choices.
  27. d.   This is the only choice that logically follows the topic: It provides a possible reason why Americans are fascinated with reality television. The other choices do not follow the topic sentence.
  28. d.   Only this choice addresses something mentioned in the topic sentence: the fact that pasta is easy to prepare. The other choices address topics not mentioned in the first sentence.
  29. a.   This is clearly the only choice that logically follows the statement about juries in colonial times. Choices b and c can be ruled out because they do not refer back to colonial times. Choice d refers to colonial times but not to juries.
  30. c.   This choice develops the topic sentence by providing information about what a landscaper would recommend under these conditions. Choices a, b, and d veer away from the topic.
  31. b.   This is the only choice that develops the topic sentence. Choice a does not even mention gingko. Choice c is redundant because Europe is part of the world. Choice d, by referring to an old study, veers completely away from the topic.
  32. a.   Only this choice addresses something mentioned in the topic sentence: the fact that cats have good hygiene. The other choices address topics not mentioned in the first sentence.
  33. d.   The passage is about the cassowary bird, not about human beings. Sentence 4 is irrelevant to the topic.
  34. c.   This is the only sentence that does not mention sleepwalking, which is the subject of the passage.
  35. d.   Although there is a connection between Lyme disease and deer ticks, this connection is not made in the paragraph.
  36. d.   The first three sentences are written in an objective, professional tone. The tone of Sentence 4 is much more personal and subjective so even though it says something about a harp, it is quite out of character in this paragraph.
  37. b.   This is the only sentence that mentions religion or any human activity at all. The other sentences define the solstices in lay science terms.
  38. a.   The other three sentences objectively discuss the role and qualifications of a meteorologist. Sentence 1 tells us what people think of weather forecasters. Its tone is also much more casual than the rest of the paragraph.
  39. b.   This choice has the objective tone of a textbook and is a general statement. The other choices describe a particular child and are written in a fictional style.
  40. b.   Choices a, c, and d list specific characteristics of the two different types of ghosts, benevolent (good) and malevolent (bad). Choice b is just an ironic observation on the general subject of ghosts.
  41. d.   The first three sentences address different types of weight-lifting exercises, while the fourth sentence addresses the topic of trainers at local gyms.
  42. b.   The topic of this paragraph is the writings of C. S. Lewis, not his life story. Where he lived is not specifically related to the types of books that he wrote.
  43. a.   Choice a addresses different sizes and shapes of ladders, while the rest of the paragraph deals with the dangers of ladders being placed near power lines.
  44. c.   The paragraph as a whole discusses the various parts of a book, but Sentence 3 addresses the topic of bookstores.
  45. c.   This choice is a general statement about CO poisoning. The other choices all relate to a firefighter's specific duties in dealing with victims of CO poisoning.
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