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Plot Conflict and Resolution Practice Exercises

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Updated on Sep 29, 2011

Read the following study guide for a concept review:

Plot Conflict and Resolution Study Guide

Plot Conflict and Resolution Practice Exercises

Practice 1: No Exit 

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) As the robot came closer, Zantur knew it would be almost impossible to escape. He slipped around a corner and held his breath as the metallic monitor clanked by. Zantur was determined to get out. . . . He didn't know why he'd let the others talk him into coming in the first place! They knew of his fear, yet they persisted, taunting him until he agreed to join them. But now . . . now he just couldn't go through with it! He carefully peered around the corner. The robot was nowhere in sight, so Zantur inched his way toward an EXIT sign flashing ahead of him. Just as he reached out to unlatch the pod covering, the robot grabbed his arm. "CAUGHT! CAUGHT!" it beeped loudly.
(2) People came rushing down the hall. "Aha! It was you!" someone shouted. "Are you just getting here . . . trying to get in through a latched pod door?"
(3) Zantur pulled his arm from the robot's clutch. "Ye-ye-yeah!" he stammered. "Sorry to be late. I'm really looking forward to this!" Then he forced a smile as he joined his graduating class in the dance room for the prom. He looked at Debu and she shyly smiled. He so wished he wasn't afraid to ask her to dance!
1. What is the main conflict in this story?
a. Zantur doesn't want to go to the prom.
b. Zantur needs to hide from the robot monitor.
c. Zantur forgot to get Debu flowers for the dance.
d. Debu wants Zantur to ask her to dance.
2. Zantur plans to solve his problem by
a. taking dance lessons.
b. dismantling the robot.
c. escaping from the building.
d. playing in the dance band.
3. How does Zantur resolve the problem?
a. He opens the pod and escapes.
b. He doesn't because he still has to go to the dance.
c. He decides he likes to dance.
d. He hides in a closet all night.

Practice 2: Unequal Wages

Adapted from a Russian Folk Tale

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) Mr. Moscov was a rich man who had many workers in his factory. He treated them all well and they were fond of him. They knew he was honest and would often ask for his advice.
(2) John and Joseph were two such workers. John was paid $4.00 a week, and Joseph was paid $10.00. John's job was very hard. He moved heavy furniture and carried hefty boxes up and down the stairs. But Joseph only worked in a nice office, writing letters for Moscov and keeping the business records. So John often wondered why Joseph earned so much more money. Finally, he decided to ask Mr. Moscov. "Sir, something puzzles me," John said. "Can you please explain?"
(3) John told Moscov what was bothering him. Moscov listened attentively, then said, "Yes, I'll explain the difference between your wages and Joseph's, but first, do something for me. Do you see that loaded wagon in the driveway? Ask the driver, please, what he has in his load."
(4) John quickly went and did as he was asked. When he returned, he told Moscov the wagon was loaded with wheat. "Where is the wheat going?" asked Moscov.
(5) Again, John went outside to talk to the driver of the wagon. "The wheat is to be delivered in the next town," he reported when he returned.
(6) "And from where is the wheat coming?" Moscov asked.
(7) Once more John rushed outside, spoke to the wagon driver, and returned with the answer. Then Moscov wanted to know how much grain was in the load. As soon as John learned that, Moscov sent him back to ask how much the wheat was worth per bushel! A very weary John shuffled out again to the wagon. Altogether, he made six trips to get answers to Moscov's questions!
(8) Then Moscov sent for Joseph, who was in another room. "Joseph, please run out to that driver and ask him what he has in his wagon. I want to know."
(9) Quickly, Joseph ran out and was back in less time than it took John to ask his first question. "The driver is from Sinyava and is delivering a load of wheat from Svod to Brod," said Joseph. "He's been on the road since early morning and expects to arrive in Brod before nightfall. He's carrying 120 bushels of wheat, worth 75 cents a bushel. But, he says. the wheat crop is large this year, so he expects the price to fall before long. Is that all, Sir?"
(10) "Yes, thank you, Joseph," said Moscov.
(11) When Joseph left the room, Moscov turned to John. "Now, John," he said, "do you understand why Joseph earns more money than you?"
(12) John nodded. "Yes, Sir," he sighed, "he has to think while he works!"
4. The conflict in this story is that
a. Joseph wants more money.
b. Moscov has no time to listen to his employees.
c. John wants to know why he makes less money than Joseph.
d. John wants the driver of the wagon to come talk to Mosov.
5. How does John plan to resolve the conflict?
a. Threaten to quit his job.
b. Go on strike.
c. Offer to loan Joseph some money.
d. Ask Mr. Moscov why he pays Joseph more.
6. Which is part of the rising action?
a. Mr. Moscov repeatedly sends John out to question a driver.
b. Joseph drives the wagon to Brod.
c. Mr. Moscov offers to buy the wheat.
d. John and Joseph exchange jobs.
7. The climax of the story is when
a. Joseph offers to work for less money.
b. Mr. Moscov sends Joseph to give a letter to the driver.
c. John helps the driver unload the wagon.
d. Joseph goes outside only once and gets all the answers.
8. The conflict is resolved when John realizes that
a. Joseph can carry heavy things, too!
b. Mr. Moscov doesn't know why he pays Joseph more.
c. using your brain can be hard work, too!
d. the driver doesn't own the wheat he's delivering.
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