Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus

Point of View Practice Exercises

based on 15 ratings
By
Updated on Sep 29, 2011

Read the following study guide for a concept review:

Point of View Study Guide

Point of View Practice Exercises

Practice 1: Dracula

Excerpted and adapted from the book by Bram Stoker

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) The carriage went at a hard pace straight along. Then we made a complete turn and went along another straight road. It seemed to me that we were simply going over and over the same ground again, so I took note of a landmark and found this was so. I would have liked to ask the driver what this meant, but I feared to do so. By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time was passing, I struck a match. By its flame, I looked at my watch. It was a few minutes until midnight.
(2) Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road. It was a long, agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and then another and another. Borne on the wind now sighing softly through the Pass, a wild howling seemed to come from all over the country through the gloom of night. The horses began to strain and rear, but the driver quieted them down. Then, from the mountains on each side of us rose a louder, sharper howling. It was that of wolves, which affected both the horses and me in the same way.
1. The most likely narrator of this selection is
a. the character who's driving the carriage.
b. the character who owns the horses.
c. the farmer whose dog is howling.
d. the character who's riding in the carriage.
2. Which words in the first paragraph were clues to the point of view?
a. they, driver, this
b. we, I, my
c. by, how, it
d. it, its, this
3. This selection is told from
a. a third-person point of view.
b. a second-person point of view.
c. a first-person point of view
d. a fourth-person point of view.

Practice 2: The Flight of Icarus

A Greek Myth Retold

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) In ancient Greece lived Daedalus, a talented and clever builder. He created everything from palaces to playthings for the wealthy. One of his rich clients was Minos, the King of Crete, an island in the Mediterranean.
(2) Minos was thought to be the richest and most powerful ruler of his time. He hired Daedalus to design and build a special, intricate maze, or labyrinth, to hold the Minotaur. It was a terrifying half-bull, half-human creature with a great appetite for humans. Minos wanted the creature confined somewhere in the maze so that it couldn't escape and be a threat to his people.
(3) Daedalus designed a masterful, mysterious maze, and his young son Icarus helped him create it. When the maze was finished, Minos had his soldiers release the Minotaur into it. But Minos worried that someone might find a way through the maze to release the creature. He had to make sure no one else ever knew the secret of the maze. So, to guarantee that Daedalus or Icarus could never reveal the secret, Minos imprisoned them in a very high tower.
(4) Daedalus looked around. The tower had no windows or doors from which to escape. Only the top of the tower was open, spreading a ceiling of sky above them. Through it, day-after-day, an archer sent arrows tied with packets of food and tiny wax candles to help them see at night. The walls were too high to climb. There was no way out!
(5) But the brilliant Daedalus devised a plan. Over time he and Icarus ate very little and grew thinner and lighter. At night, they used only the light from the moon and stars, and saved the tiny candles. Daedalus and Icarus used the leftover food to attract some of the thousands of birds that migrated across the sky above them. They plucked a single feather from each bird that landed, knowing that one feather was not enough to stop them from flying.
(6) Daedalus explained to Icarus how the candle wax would hold the feathers on their arms like wings. They waited for a perfect day, when strong winds blew from the south … strong enough to carry them north toward Athens. At last, that day arrived. As they prepared to leave, Daedalus warned Icarus not to fly too high. "The heat of the sun could melt the wax that holds your wing feathers in place," he warned.
(7) Then the wind lifted Daedalus and Icarus off the tower and they soared like birds high above the maze. Icarus flew higher and higher, enjoying the thrill of flight so much that he forgot his father's advice. The higher he flew, the thinner the air, and soon he could hardly breathe. He was hot and confused. Perhaps the height affected his brain. The sun began to melt the wax that held the feathers on to his arms. Icarus flapped his arms but to no avail. He tumbled like a wounded bird into the sea. Only a few scattered feathers floated on the water. Daedalus mourned his son, then continued on to safety.
4. Who is the narrator of this passage?
a. the character of Icarus
b. the character of Daedalus
c. a third person, not a character
d. the character of Minos
5. Which sentence is written from the first-person point of view?
a. The higher Icarus flew, the thinner the air, and soon he could hardly breathe.
b. The higher I flew, the thinner the air, and soon I could hardly breathe.
c. The higher you flew, the thinner the air, and soon you could hardly breathe.
d. The higher he flew, the thinner the air, and soon Icarus could hardly breathe.
6. Which sentence is written from the second-person point of view?
a. The higher Icarus flew, the thinner the air, and soon he could hardly breathe.
b. The higher I flew, the thinner the air, and soon I could hardly breathe.
c. The higher you flew, the thinner the air, and soon you could hardly breathe.
d. The higher he flew, the thinner the air, and soon Icarus could hardly breathe.
7. Rewrite the second to last paragraph from the story in the first person, as if you were Daedalus.
Daedalus explained to Icarus how the candle wax would hold the feathers on their arms like wings. They waited for a perfect day, when strong winds blew from the south … strong enough to carry them north toward Athens. At last, that day arrived. As they prepared to leave, Daedalus warned Icarus not to fly too high. "The heat of the sun could melt the wax that holds your wing feathers in place," he warned.
View Full Article
Add your own comment

Ask a Question

Have questions about this article or topic? Ask
Ask
150 Characters allowed