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Point of View Practice Exercises (page 2)

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Updated on Sep 29, 2011

Practice 3: A Journey to the Interior of the Earth

Excerpted and adapted from the novel by Jules Verne

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19. Fortunately, the wind blows violently, and has enabled us to flee from the scene of the late terrible struggle. My uncle, Professor Liedenbrock, began again to look impatiently around him. The voyage resumes its natural tone.
(2) THURSDAY, AUGUST 20. About noon, a distant noise is heard. I note the fact without being able to explain it. It is a continuous roar. Three hours pass. The roarings seem to come from a very distant waterfall and I remark this to my uncle, who replies, "Axel, you may be right."
(3) Are we, then, speeding forward to some waterfall, which will throw us down an abyss? This method of getting to the center of the earth may please my uncle, but I prefer an ordinary horizontal movement. At any rate, now the roarings are increasingly louder. Do they come from the sky or the ocean? I look up. The sky is calm and motionless. I look out to the horizon, which is unbroken and clear of all mist. If the noise is coming from a waterfall and the ocean does flow headlong into a lower level, then the water would move faster as a sign of the danger ahead. I quickly observe the water. It moves at normal speed. I throw an empty bottle into the sea: It lies still in the water.
(4) Hans climbs the mast to look out across the sea and points to the south, saying: "Down there! I see a vast cone of water rising from the surface!"
(5) "Is it another sea beast?" I ask. "Then let us steer farther westward, for we know something of the danger of coming across monsters of that sort."
(6) "Let us go straight on, Axel," replies my uncle, calmly.
(7) The nearer we approach, the higher the jets of water. What monster could possibly fill itself with such a quantity of water, and spurt it up so continuously? By evening, we are close enough to see its body—dark, enormous, like a hill spread upon the sea as an island. Is it illusion or fear? Its length seems to me a couple of thousand yards!
(8) What can this creature be, that no explorer who came here before made note of? It lies motionless, as if asleep. The column of water it throws up to a height of five hundred feet falls in rain with a deafening uproar. And here we are, heading like lunatics to get near to a monster that a hundred whales a day would not satisfy!
8. This selection is told from
a. a fourth-person point of view.
b. a third-person point of view.
c. a second-person point of view.
d. a first-person point of view
9. The narrator of the story is
a. Hans.
b. Axel.
c. Professor Liedenbrock.
d. the sea monster.
10. Which sentence is written from the second-person point of view?
a. "Is it another sea beast?" I ask.
b. "Is it another sea beast?" Hans asks.
c. "Is it another sea beast?" you ask.
d. "Is it another sea beast?" they ask.
11. If Hans were the narrator, the story would probably be different because
a. he would tell what he personally saw, said, felt, and did.
b. he would tell more about how Axel was feeling.
c. it would be told from the third person point of view.
d. it would be more about the kinds of foods they ate on the voyage.
12. Rewrite this second paragraph from the story in the third person. Remember to change any necessary verb endings.
About noon, a distant noise is heard. I note the fact without being able to explain it. It is a continuous roar. Three hours pass. The roarings seem to come from a very distant waterfall and I remark this to my uncle, who replies, "Axel, you may be right."
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