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Pronouns in the Subjective, Objective, and Possessive Case for English Grammar

By — McGraw-Hill Professional
Updated on Aug 12, 2011

Practice exercises for this study guide can be found at:

Pronoun Practice Exercises for English Grammar

Pronouns in the Subjective Case

A pronoun used as the subject of a verb is in the subjective case.

    She was one of the brightest pupils in the school.
    I know that most people want to marry.
    The people who were willing to wait in line found that they were able to purchase tickets at a reduced rate.
    The concert that he attended was rewarding.

Pronouns in the Objective Case

A pronoun used as the object or indirect object of a verb is in the objective case.

    Veterinarians inspect them each year.
    Lawyers can be counted on to give us competent interpretations of the penal code.

Pronouns as Objects of Verbals

A pronoun used as the object or indirect object of a verbal is in the objective case.

    Having surveyed it, the general decided that the river could not be forded.     (it direct object of past participle having surveyed.)
    While questioning me, the accountant found many more legitimate tax deductions.     (me direct object of present participle questioning.)
    To give him all the credit he deserves, I will grant that he tried hard.     (him indirect object of infinitive to give.)
    Fighting her proved more difficult than I expected.     (her direct object of gerund fighting.)

Pronouns as Objects of Prepositions

A pronoun used as the object of a preposition is in the objective case.

    We spoke to her as forcefully as possible.
    The librarian promptly gave the manuscript to him.
    To whom did you deliver the bouquet?

Pronouns in the Possessive Case

A pronoun indicating possession is in the possessive case.

    Yours is the last one I will accept.
    Jon made full restitution because the book he destroyed proved to be mine.
    Whose will you be carrying?

Pronouns as Appositives

A pronoun used as an appositive—a word or phrase that explains or identifies a word or phrase nearby—is in the same case as the word with which it is in apposition.

Subjective

    We, Linda and I, will underwrite the cost of Sam's education.     (I is in the subjective case because it is in apposition with We, the subject of the verb will underwrite.)

Objective

    All the damage incurred in the accident was caused by us, Mickey and me.     (Me is in the objective case because it is in apposition with us, the object of a preposition.)

Possessive

    She asked whose bicycle had been broken, Margaret's or mine.     (Mine is in the possessive case because it is in apposition with whose, which is a possessive adjective.)

Practice exercises for this study guide can be found at:

Pronoun Practice Exercises for English Grammar

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