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Spelling Regular Verbs Study Guide (page 2)

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Updated on Sep 28, 2011

Future Tense

The future tense indicates future action (action that hasn't happened yet, but will).

Brady will ski with us this week.

The future tense is formed by combining will with the present tense of the verb.

Progressive 

The progressive category is comprised of the present progressive tense, the past progressive tense, and the future progressive tense.

Present Progressive Tense

The present progressive tense indicates action that is in progress (action that is happening). The present progressive is formed by combining am, is, or are with the -ing form of the verb.

They are watching "American Idol."

Keep the rules for adding endings to words in mind when forming the progressive tenses. It is important to note that you must drop a final -e before adding -ing to form the present participle (a present participle is used with the verb to be, to indicate an action that is ongoing; for example, shine becomes is shining).

Past Progressive Tense

The past progressive tense indicates action that was occurring at some specific time in the past.

Abbie was ordering a milk shake.

The past progressive is formed by combining was or were with the -ing form of the verb.

Future Progressive Tense

The future progressive tense indicates action that is continuous or will occur in the future.

Claire will be playing lacrosse this spring.

The future progressive is formed by combining will be with the -ing form of the verb.

TIP: The past-participle form of a verb is usually the simple past form of the verb: verb + -ed. This is the case with regular verbs. For example, stop becomes stopped, talk becomes talked, and wash becomes washed. With irregular verbs, however, this is not always the case. For example, run becomes ran (not runned) and drink becomes drank (not drinked).

Remember, some verbs double the final consonant or drop a final y or e when endings like -d and -ed are added.

Perfect 

The perfect category is comprised of the present perfect tense, the past perfect tense, and the future perfect tense.

Present Perfect Tense

The present perfect tense indicates that the action started some time in the past and is still going on.

Hannah has cleaned her room all day.

The present perfect is formed by combining the helping verb have or has with the past-participle form of the verb. Keep the rules for adding endings to verbs in mind when forming this tense!

Past Perfect Tense

The past perfect tense indicates action that occurred some time in the past before another action began.

Katie had returned her books to the library before Ashley asked to borrow them.

Much like the present-perfect form, the past perfect is formed by combining the helping verb had with the past participle form of the verb. Helping verbs let you know when the action of a verb takes place.

Future Perfect Tense

The future perfect tense indicates action that will occur and finish in the future before another action begins.

Ethan will have attended soccer camp before the start of the fall season.

The future perfect tense is formed by combining the helping verbs will have, would have, or will have been with the past-participle form of the verb.

Practice exercises for this study guide can be found at:

Spelling Regular Verbs Practice Exercises

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