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Source Data and Sampling Frames Help (page 3)

By — McGraw-Hill Professional
Updated on Aug 26, 2011

Practice 2

Suppose you want to figure out the quantitative effect (if any) that cigarette smoking has on people's blood pressure. You conduct the experiment on a worldwide basis, for all races of people, female and male. You interview people and ask them how much they smoke, and you measure their blood pressures. The population for your experiment is the set of all people in the world. Obviously you can't carry out this experiment for this entire population! Suppose you interview 100 people from each country in the world. The resulting group of people constitutes the sampling frame. What are some of the possible flaws with this scheme? Pose the issues as questions.

Solution 2

Here are some questions that would have to be answered, and the issues resolved, before you could have confidence in the accuracy of this experiment.

  • How do you account for the fact that some countries have far more people than others?
  • How do you account for the fact that the genetic profiles of the people in various countries differ?
  • How do you account for the fact that people smoke more in some countries than in others?
  • How do you account for the fact that the average age of the people in various countries differs, and age is known to affect blood pressure?
  • How do you account for differences in nutrition in various countries, a factor that is also known to affect blood pressure?
  • How do you account for differences in environmental pollutants, a factor that may affect blood pressure?
  • Is 100 people in each officially recognized country a large enough sampling frame?

Practice problems for these concepts can be found at:

Sampling and Estimation Practice Test

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