Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus

Reading Tone and Style Practice Exercises

based on 9 ratings
By
Updated on Sep 29, 2011

Review the following study guide if needed:

Reading Tone and Style Study Guide

Reading Tone and Style Practice Exercises

Practice 1: Saving Electricity 

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) Many power plants use fossil fuels, like coal and oil, to produce electricity. They formed more than millions of years ago from the remains of ancient plants and animals and can't be replaced … unless we want to wait million of years more! So it's crucial to use electricity wisely. You can help. Look for these and other places where electricity's being wasted … then stop wasting it!
  • Close the refrigerator door quickly.
  • Let your hair dry naturally!
  • Run a dishwasher or washing machine only when full.
  • Turn off lights when not in use.
  • Unplug TVs, DVD players, and other appliances that have clocks when not in use—they continue to draw energy to display time, even when switched off!
  • Unplug phone chargers when not in use—they draw small amounts of energy all the time if you don't!
1. What is the tone of the selection?
a. comical
b. serious
c. disrespectful
d. mysterious
2. Why do you think the author chose to use the word crucial instead of its synonym important?
a. to add a light touch to the text
b. to show disagreement about energy consumption
c. to imply that there should be no power plants
d. to stress the urgent need to conserve resources
3. Part of the author's style includes the use of
a. words in parenthesis ( ).
b. very short sentences.
c. ellipses( … ).
d. foreign words.

Practice 1: Adapted From the Last Leaf

by O'Henry

Read the selection, and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) Julia and Marissa moved into a small New York apartment, hoping to start careers as fashion designers. Other people in the building were also artists, and quite friendly. When winter came, many of them suffered with colds and flu, and several, including Julia, were caught in the grip of pneumonia.
(2) The illness made it hard for Julia to breathe. She slept a lot and when she was awake, she sat quietly in a chair, staring out the window and sighing. The constant struggle sapped her will to live and she refused the food Marissa fixed for her. Finally, Marissa asked the doctor if Julia would ever get better. He hesitated, then said, "Her only chance is to want to get better. The human body's a wonderful thing … it can heal, but we must help it by believing that it will. I'm afraid that without a change of heart, she won't make it."
(3) Marissa hid her tears as she tried to interest Julia in sketches of spring fashions. But Julia just muttered. "Eleven, ten, nine," then, "eight, seven, six."
(4) "What are you counting?" asked Marissa looking in the direction her friend was staring. All she could see was an old oak tree with almost no leaves.
(5) "The leaves," murmured Julia. "When they're gone, I will go, too."
(6) "What are you talking about?" Marissa exclaimed. "Leaves have nothing to do with your getting better! You have to want to get better! I'm shutting these curtains, and we're not talking about this again!"
(7) After Julia fell asleep, Marissa went to Johann, an old painter who lived in the building. Tearfully, she told him her plan and he agreed. All night, Marissa heard the wind howling mournfully and rain splashing against the windowpane. She knew the remaining leaves would be blown away by morning.
(8) When Julia awoke, Marissa opened the curtains to reveal one leaf remaining on the tree. "It's the last leaf," she sighed. "I was sure they'd all be gone."
(9) All day the leaf clung to the tree, despite the beating wind. Julia watched intently as the leaf refused to leave the safety of the branch and fall, dead to the ground. Finally, she took a deep breath … then another … and called to Marissa, "Could I please have some toast? I need to get my strength back. I can't just waste my life away… We're going to be great designers someday!"
(10) Later, when Julia had greatly improved, Marissa whispered, "I need to tell you that … Johann has pneumonia. The super found him in the rain a few days ago. He'd just painted an oak leaf on that tree … because the last leaf had fallen."
(11) "Oh, Marissa," cried Julia. "He saved my life by making me want to be strong like the leaf and live. Now we must do something for him." And so they did.
4. What is the overall tone of the selection?
a. angry
b. comical
c. mysterious
d. emotional
5. What is the tone of the last paragraph?
a. frightening
b. hopeful
c. irritated
d. comical
6. Why do you think the author chose to use the words caught in the grip of?
a. to imply that pneumonia squeezed the life, or breath, from its victims
b. to show that pneumonia and flu were alike
c. to imply that pneumonia was not serious
d. to state that pneumonia is contagious
7. Read these words from the selection: the remaining leaves would be blown away by morning. Which might the author most likely have considered using instead of morning?
a. the next day
b. for sure
c. daybreak
d. after all
8. What is the author's overall style?
a. friendly
b. mocking
c. playful
d. creepy
View Full Article
Add your own comment