Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus

How to Submit Articles

We welcome article queries and submissions. The best way to submit them is via e-mail: editorial@education.com.

We ask that you please send the text of your query or submission in plain text in the body of your e-mail, rather than as an attached file, as we may not be able to read the format of your file. Please put the words "EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS" in the subject line of the e-mail.

Before you submit, please spend some time familiarizing yourself with the style and tone of our site. Then send a short pitch with an appropriate idea. No need to send a resume, but please do tell us a little bit about yourself -- your experience and background as a writer and qualifications for writing the project you are pitching. We are particularly interested in hearing from teachers, counselors, and other writers with a background in education and childcare. If you have clips, you should supply no more than four links to web pages that contain your work.

We do our best to respond to all inquiries, but be aware that we are a small staff and sometimes cannot respond to every request. If you have not heard back from us after three weeks, please assume that we will not be able to use your idea or submission.

Also please note that Education.com focuses on stories of interest to parents of preschool-grade 5 children. We do not produce new content on topics related to infancy, middle school, high school, or college.

What type of content are we looking for?

Users depend on our site for answers to their most pressing parental issues, but also for ideas that make family life more fun. We cover topics across the parental spectrum—from how to make homemade finger-paint to navigating the parent-teacher conference. The site is comprised of educational and lifestyle content, of interest to parents of preschool-grade 5 children.

We are currently accepting submissions for the following site sections:

Homepage features: Short, often news-driven topics. 600-800 words. (Previous examples: "Obama on Education", "Is Autism on the Rise?", "Raising a Sensitive Child", "Kindergarten Readiness", "Are Learning Styles a Myth?")

Activities: Grade-specific project ideas, with step-by-step directions, for parents to do with a child. These pieces contain a short intro paragraph, then launch right into the directions. The best activities have some sort of learning benefit for the grade (for example, an activity might help a kindergartener practice writing) but they're so fun kids don't even realize they're learning. Activities are divided by grade and topic. Topics include: reading, math, writing, science, social studies, arts and crafts, and outdoors. (Previous examples: "Make a Rain Bag", "Decoupage Easter Eggs", "Plant Your Name with Seeds")

Science Fair: These are grade-specific science project ideas with step-by-step directions and a clear explanation of the scientific principles behind that project. We pride ourselves on having a library of projects that parents can rely on to make sure science isn’t a snooze! We especially want teachers or persons with strong science backgrounds for this job. If you think you can turn physics into fun, please write us with a brief description of your qualifications and a proposal for an exciting science project that we don’t already have on the site.

Worksheets: This one’s a little different. We are always on the hunt for talented graphic artists to create worksheets for our printable workbooks. We look for artists that are not only great illustrators, but that have a strong sense of graphic design conventions and, above all, innately understand the kind of art and language that appeals to kids. Our graphic design needs are constantly changing, but we are always willing to keep the information of strong applicants on file for future projects.

Workbooks:  Our printable workbooks help kids in preschool through grade 5 practice key skills in the areas of reading, math, writing, science and social studies.  The concept specifications for these workbooks are written by teachers, and we are always looking to contract new teachers. No graphic design skills are needed for concepting a workbook, but an understanding of how to teach the skill set being targeted is crucial. If you have a passion for producing printable materials that result in positive learning outcomes in children, please write us with a sample workbook idea. Here is an example of a workbook pitch:

Title Idea: Working with Long Words
Key Skills: Practice spelling and challenge vocabulary, prefixes/suffixes rules, word patterns
Target Grade:  5th
Basic theme or concept:  This would be a workbook for students who are strong readers for their age and a way to reinforce spelling patterns and decoding words through common prefixes and suffixes. The workbook will be forest themed through non-fiction reading and public domain fiction.

We publish a lot of content. We're always looking for freelancers with great ideas and consistent dependability. Look at our site and make sure you have a sense of our style and tone. Then submit!