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Kindergarten Math

Math Study Help

Make an ABC, 123 Book!

This simple, yet fun, bookmaking activity introduces and reinforces alphabet and number recognition skills that have been taught at home or learned in preschool.

Froggie Counting Game

Help froggie hop home! Here's a simple game you and your kindergarten child can make together to teach counting and the number line while having a fun time together.

My Backyard Counting Book

To master counting to ten, kindergarteners often count their fingers and toes. Have him apply his natural curiosity about the outdoors to counting practice, and create a counting book for repeated practice!

Addition War

Are you tired of worksheets and flashcards? This card game is a fun way to practice addition. Compete for the highest score as you flip over cards.

Estimation Breakfast

Remember that old carnival game where you had to guess how many jellybeans were in a jar? Well, guessing is more than pure fun, it's also a key part of kindergarten math. Here's how to bring it to the breakfast table!

Make a ME Timeline

Help your child create a "Me Timeline," a unique poster that works on key math and early social studies skills: putting events in order.

Nuts and Bolts: A Sorting Activity

Does Dad's tool box need to be tidied up? Get your child to help you clean, while sneaking in a little math along the way. Sorting objects by size, color, shape, or function is an important concept in mathematical reasoning, and it's the perfect excuse for a little housekeeping!

Make Your Own Coin Bank!

Here's a coin bank craft that's designed to build connections to early reading, social studies, and math. And who knows--save up those pennies and nickels week by week, and your child may have saved a nice bit of change by second grade!

Make a Ladybug Storyboard!

Does it bug you that math isn't more fun? Teachers have been using flannel boards for years to make stories sing. Now you can make your own version of the flannel board and help bring math to life!

Make a Paper Chain Calendar

Young kids usually have only a vague sense of time. They probably know that an hour is longer than ten minutes, and a week is shorter than a month, but it's difficult for them to gauge time's passing. Making a paper chain calendar can help.

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