Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets.
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Understanding Dialogue: Tom Sawyer
Pecos Bill!
Violin Facts
The Butterfly That Stamped
This series of worksheets on famous explorers introduces kids to a handful of important world travelers that they may not even learn about in school! They'll love learning about their accomplishments while they practice their vocabulary, reading comprehension and writing skills.
The Story of Journey
Stingray Facts
Sort Out the Scientific Method #4
Find the Letter D: Hey Diddle Diddle
Rochelle's Birthday Surprise
Irregular Past-Tense Verbs: Found It!
Shakuntala Devi
Reading Comprehension: Dr. Dolittle
Fan Fiction
Fictional Character Development
All About Werewolves
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets.

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.

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