Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .
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Slam Book Slam Book Is your child having trouble figuring out his summer reading?
All About Frankenstein All About Frankenstein Learn about a world famous monster, with this Halloween reading activity!
Main Idea of a Story Worksheet Main Idea of a Story Worksheet Understanding the main idea of a story is a big first step on the road to comprehension.
Find the Letter O: Little Boy Blue Find the Letter O: Little Boy Blue How many Os does it take to wake up the boy that looks after the sheep?
These reading and writing worksheets are a fun and educational companion to the Summer Olympic Games. From reading comprehension worksheets about Olympic history to writing prompts that challenge kids to think big, we've got the Summer Games covered. The Olympics is always a fun theme for kids, and covers multiple subjects at once, including language arts, social studies and geography.
Language Arts Worksheets for the Summer Olympics These reading and writing worksheets are a fun and educational companion to the Summer Olympic Games.
Interactive Story Writing Interactive Story Writing This reading exercise puts your child in the driver's seat, and has him steer the story by filling in the blanks.
Saxophone Facts Saxophone Facts Young readers will love digging into this passage's cool saxophone facts, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
History of Baseball History of Baseball Batter up! It's time to get a hands-on history lesson in this fun printable activity that flexes your fourth-grader's memory and comprehension muscles
Scrambled Similes Scrambled Similes The similes on this page got all mixed up! Can your child put them back together again?
Historical Heroes: Maya Angelou Historical Heroes: Maya Angelou Learn more about author, activist and poet Maya Angelou!
Story Sequencing: Lunch Time Story Sequencing: Lunch Time This lunch time story is completely out of order!
From literature and historical biographies to zombies, this collection of reading comprehension worksheets has something for every kind of kid.
Read and Analyze: 10 Comprehension Worksheets From literature and historical biographies to zombies, this collection of reading comprehension worksheets has something for every kind of kid.
How the Alphabet Was Made How the Alphabet Was Made Make reading time fun, with this classic short story by Rudyard Kipling.
Amerigo Vespucci Amerigo Vespucci America gets its name from Amerigo Vespucci, the man who discovered that the Americas made up a landmass separate from Asia.
Mikki and the Jacket Mikki and the Jacket By writing his own story in this worksheet, your child can learn to "fill in the blanks" of reading comprehension.
Check out our most pinned worksheets of January 2013!
January's Pinterest Favorites: Top 10 Worksheets Check out our most pinned worksheets of January 2013!
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.