Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school with folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more.
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Main Idea of a Story Worksheet Main Idea of a Story Worksheet This main idea worksheet guides your child through reading comprehension practice.
Practice Punctuation Practice Punctuation Written passages look pretty silly without punctuation, and sometimes they're difficult to read!
Piano Facts Piano Facts Young readers will love digging into this passage's cool piano facts, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Complete the Mystery Complete the Mystery Boost reading comprehension skills with this language arts worksheet.
Marco Polo Marco Polo Your child will love learning all about the exploits of the famous European explorer Marco Polo with this attractively illustrated worksheet.
Bessie Coleman and Mae Jemison Bessie Coleman and Mae Jemison Explore the lives of two high-flying pioneers, Bessie Coleman and Mae Jemison, with short biographies and a Venn diagram.
Fan Fiction Fan Fiction Create a new story using characters from a summer reading or assigned book in this fan fiction worksheet.
Jellyfish Facts Jellyfish Facts Young readers will love digging into this passage's cool jellyfish facts, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Idioms: A Figure of Speech Idioms: A Figure of Speech What does "when pigs fly" mean if pigs can't really fly?
Find the Main Idea: Viceroy Butterfly Find the Main Idea: Viceroy Butterfly Kids show off their reading comprehension skills with this language arts worksheet.
Story Comprehension: What's in a Story? Story Comprehension: What's in a Story? Story webs organize a story into one main idea and several details.
Reading for Comprehension: Following Directions Reading for Comprehension: Following Directions Help your third grader practice following directions on how to build a tornado in a bottle, and build his reading comprehension skills in the process.
Young readers will love digging into these great passages on their favorite musical instruments, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Facts About Musical Instruments Young readers will love digging into these great passages on their favorite musical instruments, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
All About Zombies All About Zombies Get into the spirit of Halloween with a spooky info page, all about zombies!
All About Ghosts All About Ghosts Get ready for a ghostly reading activity! Here's a Halloween sheet that will teach your child all about ghosts and the history behind these spooks.
Guitar Facts Guitar Facts Young readers will love digging into this passage's cool guitar facts, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school with folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more.

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.