Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .
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Find the Letter K: Hickory, Dickory, Dock Find the Letter K: Hickory, Dickory, Dock How many Ks are needed to get a mouse up and down a clock?
Practice Punctuation Practice Punctuation Written passages look pretty silly without punctuation, and sometimes they're difficult to read!
Shakuntala Devi Shakuntala Devi A natural with numbers, Shakuntala Devi rose to fame at a young age by showing the calculator who's boss with her lightning-fast mental math.
Fan Fiction Fan Fiction Create a new story using characters from a summer reading or assigned book in this fan fiction worksheet.
Sort Out the Scientific Method #3 Sort Out the Scientific Method #3 Hypothesis, observation, data, conclusion...with so many terms, learning the scientific method can be a big challenge.
Paul Bunyan Paul Bunyan Can your child tell fact from fiction? Boost reading comprehension with this story sheet featuring a famous tall tale character: Paul Bunyan!
Reading: The Wind in the Willows Reading: The Wind in the Willows Embark on an adventure through the woods with the Mole, in this excerpt from Kenneth Grahame's charming book, The Wind in the Willows.
Punctuation: A Christmas Carol Punctuation: A Christmas Carol Need a little punctuation practice? Here's a great worksheet that will challenge your child's grammar skills, and even introduce him to some classic literature!
From 'The Legend of Sleepy Hollow' to mummies and vampires, October 31st has no shortage of monster mascots. Learn all about these beasts and famously freaky stories with these Halloween comprehension worksheets.
13 Spooky Halloween Comprehension Worksheets From "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" to mummies and vampires, October 31st has no shortage of monster mascots.
Creative Writing: Character Development Creative Writing: Character Development Here's a language arts worksheet that's sure to boost reading comprehension and critical thinking skills.
Get Your Green On: Learning Colors Get Your Green On: Learning Colors To complete this worksheet your child will name the different pictures, and then color the items that are green, helping him to practice his color recognition skills and his ability to follow simple directions.
How the Camel Got His Hump How the Camel Got His Hump Make reading practice fun with this reading comprehension packet, based on Rudyard Kipling's "How the Camel Got His Hump", including some coloring and quiz questions.
Make Nonsense Make Nonsense Let's make some nonsense! Using "Jabberwocky" by Lewis Carroll, a poem famous for its otherworldly wacky words, your child's imagination will run free as he makes his own nonsense.
Reading Comprehension: The Kitten Reading Comprehension: The Kitten Here's a worksheet that's great for improving reading comprehension skills.
Captain Henry Morgan Captain Henry Morgan Meet a pirate from history, Captain Henry Morgan.
Octopus Facts Octopus Facts Young readers will love digging into this passage's cool octopus facts, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.