Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .
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Guitar Facts Guitar Facts Young readers will love digging into this passage's cool guitar facts, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
The Story of Journey The Story of Journey This worksheet introduces kids to the fascinating true story of Journey and guides them to write a five paragraph essay about what they have read.
Young readers will love digging into these great passages on the fascinating creatures living under the sea, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process. What do they remember from the reading? In what paragraph did that information show up? Answering these questions challenges young readers to read actively and create a mental map of the passage as they go.
Marine Life Facts Young readers will love digging into these great passages on the fascinating creatures living under the sea, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
The Elephant's Child: Reading Comprehension The Elephant's Child: Reading Comprehension Enjoy Rudyard Kipling's delightful story, "The Elephant's Child", complete with a word search and reading comprehension questions about the story!
Travel Brochure Travel Brochure Explore setting by creating a travel brochure for the setting of your book.
The Mark Twain House The Mark Twain House This worksheet features a spot from the National Register of Historic Places, the boyhood home of Mark Twain.
Idioms: A Figure of Speech Idioms: A Figure of Speech Could you really pay for something with an arm and a leg?
Punctuation: The Jungle Book Punctuation: The Jungle Book With this worksheet, your child can practice his punctuation and get acquainted with a piece of classic literature!
Piano Facts Piano Facts Young readers will love digging into this passage's cool piano facts, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Madam C.J. Walker Madam C.J. Walker Madam C.J. Walker was a woman who made a lifetime out of breaking barriers.
Marco Polo Marco Polo Marco! Polo!
Irregular Plurals: Plural Practice 1 Irregular Plurals: Plural Practice 1 Some words don't become plural the regular way, by adding "s" or "es."
Hatshepsut Hatshepsut Cleopatra's cool and all, but we just can't help loving Hatshepsut, a woman who, when there were no men to take the throne, stepped up to the plate and did things her way.
The Voyage of Magellan The Voyage of Magellan In the early 1500s, Ferdinand Magellan set off to sail around the world.
The Elephant's Child The Elephant's Child Help your third grader with reading comprehension in this fun activity page on Rudyard Kipling's charming story, "The Elephant's Child."
Fictional Character Development Fictional Character Development If your child needs help understanding big ideas and concepts, have her tackle this helpful worksheet.
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.