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Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is an advanced reader, there are printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school. These reading comprehension worksheets allow your child to get some extra practice in a fun and simple format. Students will read interesting and engaging stories, including folktales, modern stories, and nonfiction, and then learn to discuss, write about, or summarize the story. Have fun and learn with reading comprehension worksheets.

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Cleopatra's cool and all, but we just can't help loving Hatshepsut, a woman who, when there were no men to take the throne, stepped in and did things her way.
Comprehension
Second Grade
History buffs and fiction lovers alike will enjoy learning about legendary writer Mark Twain with this Wild West worksheet!
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Make reading time a bit more fun with these personalized bookmark cutouts! Your child can color her own bookmark, and paste a photo on it.
Comprehension
Third Grade
Follow Chuck on vacation by looking at the pictures he took! What is he doing in each picture? Use your imagination and creativity to write captions for each.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Think about all the ways we use trees with this comprehension worksheet that explores Shel Silverstein's The Giving Tree.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Here's a worksheet that's great for improving reading comprehension skills. Kids read a simple story about a girl and her kitten then answer the question below.
Comprehension
Fourth Grade
Little brothers and sisters can be annoying sometimes, but that's never an excuse to waste a perfectly good cupcake.
Comprehension
Fourth Grade
Rootin' tootin' cowboys, gather 'round to hear the legendary story of Pecos Bill! Read this tale with your child, and see if he can tell fact from fiction.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Learn more about author, activist and poet Maya Angelou with this Historical Heroes printable - a great addition to celebrating Black History Month.
Comprehension
Second Grade
This worksheet will help your child practice his color recognition skills and his ability to follow simple directions.
Comprehension
Kindergarten
Enjoy part two of this fun Russian folk tale, about Kolobok the little ball of dough, created accidentally by an old woman.
Comprehension
First Grade
Kids who are just starting to read nonfiction can get their feet wet with this easy Julia Child biography that has a quick comprehension exercise at the end.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Enjoy a classic Aesop's fable, retold through a short collection of coloring pages! Your child will love reading this funny story as she colors.
Comprehension
First Grade
This shark is anything but fearsome, in fact, he's a bit adorable! Give your child a fun and informative coloring page, all about the whale shark.
Comprehension
First Grade
Have you ever heard of a lemon shark? Learn all about him, and why he was named that way, with a fun and informative coloring page!
Comprehension
First Grade

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Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.


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