Reading Worksheets and Printables

Our printable reading worksheets cover a variety of reading topics including early letter recognition, sight words, fluency, and comprehension. Reading comprehension worksheets feature both fiction and nonfiction stories, and make reading enjoyable with detailed illustrations and engaging comprehension questions.
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Short 'U' Sounds Color Puzzle Short "U" Sounds Color Puzzle Does your first grader enjoy solving puzzles?
Learning the Letter N Learning the Letter N Looking for a worksheet to help your child with uppercase and lowercase letters?
Halloween Vocab Words: Bats Halloween Vocab Words: Bats Help your child have some spelling and word building fun with this Halloween-themed word worksheet.
Ozark Big-Eared Bat Coloring Page Ozark Big-Eared Bat Coloring Page This coloring page features the Ozark Big-Eared Bat and some fun facts about it.
Letter S Tracing Letter S Tracing On this preschool writing worksheet, kids trace the letter S, then write the letter next to pictures whose names begin with S.
Color Rhymes Color Rhymes This worksheet not only works on color recognition, but helps preschoolers recognize rhyming sounds, and works on handwriting and spelling, too!
Vowel Blends: 'ie' and 'ei' Vowel Blends: "ie" and "ei" Sort out your vowel sounds with this exercise that investigates "ie" and "ei" sounds.
Trace and Write the Letter R Trace and Write the Letter R Rabbit, rain, and robot all begin with R! On this prekindergarten writing worksheet, kids trace the letter R, then write the letter next to pictures whose names begin with R. But watch out!
Short 'O' Sounds Color Puzzle Short "O" Sounds Color Puzzle What do the words "rock" and "sod" have in common?
Short 'I' Sounds Color Puzzle Short "I" Sounds Color Puzzle What does the short "I" sound like? Words like "dig" and "pig" contain the short I sound.
Trace and Write the Letter Q Trace and Write the Letter Q Quail, quilt, and quarter all begin with Q!
Learning the Letter M Learning the Letter M How many mugs are balanced on this tray? Your child will first need to color all the mugs one of two different colors depending on whether they have an uppercase or a lowercase M on them.
Presto-Chango! Word Changer #1 Presto-Chango! Word Changer #1 How does a rug become a car? Not by magic -- by simple spelling smarts!
Three Little Pigs Story Map Three Little Pigs Story Map Help your child comprehend his reading better by using this graphic organizer.
It's Rhyme Time! It's Rhyme Time! With this cute rhyming game, your child will learn to rhyme in no time!
Trace and Write the Letter P Trace and Write the Letter P Pencil, pretzel, and pear all begin with P!
Our printable reading worksheets cover a variety of reading topics including early letter recognition, sight words, fluency, and comprehension. Reading comprehension worksheets feature both fiction and nonfiction stories, and make reading enjoyable with detailed illustrations and engaging comprehension questions.

Tips for Reading Practice

As children progress through the elementary grades, they will go from learning to read to reading to learn. That switch is a crucial component to your child's academic success, which is why educators focus so heavily on literacy in the curriculum. Literacy skills take lots of practice, but there are many enrichment activities that can help make learning to read enjoyable. Here are a few ideas for squeezing in reading practice at home.

  • For kids just starting out on their path to reading success, try these phonics worksheets that provide guided practice with vowel-consonant-vowel words, short and long vowels, and sight words.
  • For kids learning how to make predictions about a text, encourage them to look at a book's cover. What do they think the book will be about based on what they see?
  • Encourage kids to use a strip of card stock as a bookmark and write on it words they don't know in a text. Then, help them look up the words in the dictionary to reinforce vocabulary skills.
  • Make trips to the library a regular part of your family's monthly (or weekly!) errands. Exposure to books is considered the most important thing parents can do to encourage young readers. It will also help support literary analysis skills in the older grades.