Reading Worksheets and Printables

Our printable reading worksheets cover a variety of reading topics including early letter recognition, sight words, fluency, and comprehension. Reading comprehension worksheets feature both fiction and nonfiction stories, and make reading enjoyable with detailed illustrations and engaging comprehension questions.
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Punctuation: The Lion and the Mouse Punctuation: The Lion and the Mouse If you're looking for some punctuation practice, here's the worksheet for you!
Write the Missing Letter: Super Pets Write the Missing Letter: Super Pets All of these potential pets are missing something: the first letter of their names!
Scrambled Similes Scrambled Similes The similes on this page got all mixed up! Can your child put them back together again?
How the Camel Got His Hump How the Camel Got His Hump Make reading practice fun with this reading comprehension packet, based on Rudyard Kipling's "How the Camel Got His Hump", including some coloring and quiz questions.
My Family Tree My Family Tree Here is a fun worksheet to do with your child on a weekend—he can learn about his family and have a nice a project to hang in his room when he's done.
Get Ready for Reading: All About the Letter Z Get Ready for Reading: All About the Letter Z Zzzz ... Don't let your preschooler snooze on his letter practice--especially the letter Z!
Sight Word Memory Match IV Sight Word Memory Match IV How can your child improve his memory? The best way to improve memory is through practice, and this worksheet will not only give him practice to improve his memory, but will teach him sight words.
Reading Comprehension: The Secret Garden Reading Comprehension: The Secret Garden Your little reader is sure to enjoy this selection from the children's classic, "The Secret Garden."
Black Beauty Reading Comprehension Black Beauty Reading Comprehension Liberty is precious to humans and to horses.
Get Ready for Reading: All About the Letter F Get Ready for Reading: All About the Letter F Offering handwriting practice, letter matching, and coloring, this worksheet keeps little hands busy and little minds thinking...all about the letter F!
Get Ready for Reading: All About the Letter C Get Ready for Reading: All About the Letter C What do clam, cat, and candy have in common?
First Grade Sight Words: Or to Rain First Grade Sight Words: Or to Rain Teaching your child sight words is a good way to increase his confidence as a reader.
The Mark Twain House The Mark Twain House This worksheet features a spot from the National Register of Historic Places, the boyhood home of Mark Twain.
Kindergarten Sight Words: We to With Kindergarten Sight Words: We to With Many children find it easier to learn sight words by memorizing each word as a whole rather than phonetically.
Letter Maze: X Letter Maze: X This xylophone is missing its mallets. Kids draw a path from the xylophone to the mallets by following the X's in the letter maze.
Letter Maze: E Letter Maze: E This elephant is hungry! Lead him to a peanut by following the E's in the letter maze.
Our printable reading worksheets cover a variety of reading topics including early letter recognition, sight words, fluency, and comprehension. Reading comprehension worksheets feature both fiction and nonfiction stories, and make reading enjoyable with detailed illustrations and engaging comprehension questions.

Tips for Reading Practice

As children progress through the elementary grades, they will go from learning to read to reading to learn. That switch is a crucial component to your child's academic success, which is why educators focus so heavily on literacy in the curriculum. Literacy skills take lots of practice, but there are many enrichment activities that can help make learning to read enjoyable. Here are a few ideas for squeezing in reading practice at home.

  • For kids just starting out on their path to reading success, try these phonics worksheets that provide guided practice with vowel-consonant-vowel words, short and long vowels, and sight words.
  • For kids learning how to make predictions about a text, encourage them to look at a book's cover. What do they think the book will be about based on what they see?
  • Encourage kids to use a strip of card stock as a bookmark and write on it words they don't know in a text. Then, help them look up the words in the dictionary to reinforce vocabulary skills.
  • Make trips to the library a regular part of your family's monthly (or weekly!) errands. Exposure to books is considered the most important thing parents can do to encourage young readers. It will also help support literary analysis skills in the older grades.