Reading Worksheets and Printables

Our printable reading worksheets cover a variety of reading topics including early letter recognition, sight words, fluency, and comprehension. Reading comprehension worksheets feature both fiction and nonfiction stories, and make reading enjoyable with detailed illustrations and engaging comprehension questions.
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Dot to Dot A to Z: Teddy Bear Dot to Dot A to Z: Teddy Bear Kids don't mind practicing their ABCs when it means dot to dots and teddy bears!
Missing Vowels II Missing Vowels II To complete this worksheet your child must first look at the different pictures and decide what the missing vowel is.
Dot to Dot A to Z Zebra Dot to Dot A to Z Zebra For preschoolers who've tackled the ABC song, we've got just the puzzle.
Yo-Yo Coloring Page Yo-Yo Coloring Page Not only is this coloring page cute and fun, it's also a great way to reinforce alphabet practice!
Missing Vowels Missing Vowels Can it be that this bee is missing an E? This worksheet will help your child improve his spelling skills as he practices writing vowels.
The Letter W: A Maze The Letter W: A Maze Help your child learn the letter W with the help of a maze.
Spelling Numbers Spelling Numbers Your child will have fun learning to spell as she counts to 10!
Letter V Coloring Page Letter V Coloring Page Vroom! Your preschooler won't mind practicing the alphabet with this cool coloring page all about the letter V.
Analogies Worksheet: We're Related! Analogies Worksheet: We're Related! Analogies can be a fun way for kids to build vocabulary skills and analyze relationships between words.
Raccoon Racer Ricky Raccoon Racer Ricky Preschoolers get a fun introduction to the letter R as they color the Raccoon Racer Ricky and his rad race car.
Learning Sight Words: 'To' Learning Sight Words: "To" This worksheet will help your child learn the sight word "to" by having him fill in the blanks with the word.
Q for Queen Bee! Q for Queen Bee! Help your preschooler practice recognizing the letter Q by coloring little Queen Quinn.
Find the Letters: 'M' Find the Letters: "M" These marvelous monsters will help you and your little one review the ABC's!
Follow the Letter Path from A to O Follow the Letter Path from A to O Preschoolers practice their ABC's by following the path from A to O to help the leprechaun find his way to the pot of gold.
Digraphs: Two as One 2 Digraphs: Two as One 2 What do you need to make a "chair" out of "air"?
Master of Disaster Vocabulary Master of Disaster Vocabulary To unlock the answer to this riddle your kid must first fill in the blanks with the different natural disasters that are being described.
Our printable reading worksheets cover a variety of reading topics including early letter recognition, sight words, fluency, and comprehension. Reading comprehension worksheets feature both fiction and nonfiction stories, and make reading enjoyable with detailed illustrations and engaging comprehension questions.

Tips for Reading Practice

As children progress through the elementary grades, they will go from learning to read to reading to learn. That switch is a crucial component to your child's academic success, which is why educators focus so heavily on literacy in the curriculum. Literacy skills take lots of practice, but there are many enrichment activities that can help make learning to read enjoyable. Here are a few ideas for squeezing in reading practice at home.

  • For kids just starting out on their path to reading success, try these phonics worksheets that provide guided practice with vowel-consonant-vowel words, short and long vowels, and sight words.
  • For kids learning how to make predictions about a text, encourage them to look at a book's cover. What do they think the book will be about based on what they see?
  • Encourage kids to use a strip of card stock as a bookmark and write on it words they don't know in a text. Then, help them look up the words in the dictionary to reinforce vocabulary skills.
  • Make trips to the library a regular part of your family's monthly (or weekly!) errands. Exposure to books is considered the most important thing parents can do to encourage young readers. It will also help support literary analysis skills in the older grades.