Vocabulary Worksheets

Vocabulary practice is essential to improving language arts skills. Through crossword puzzles, word searches, fill in the blanks, word addition, and homophones, your kids will build knowledge of new words and their meanings. Once your kids have learned some new vocabulary words, they will be ready to try our comprehension worksheets.
Filters
518 Results
Sort by:
What's creepy, terrifying, spooky, monstrous and frightfully fantastic? Halloween adjectives! Expand your little pumpkin's vocabulary with these wicked worksheets, full of descriptive words that are perfect for October 31st.
Help your child get a grip on grammar and create some seriously silly stories with these fill-in-the-blank worksheets.
Why did the chicken cross the state line? I'm not sure...don't Juneau?
Spring is a wonderful time to read, learn new words, and write. The warm weather and emerging plants really put us in a creative mood that's perfect for ELA practice. Help your child exercise his language arts skills with these spring-themed exercises.
Adjectives for People
Vocabulary practice is essential to improving language arts skills. Through crossword puzzles, word searches, fill in the blanks, word addition, and homophones, your kids will build knowledge of new words and their meanings. Once your kids have learned some new vocabulary words, they will be ready to try our comprehension worksheets.

Vocabulary Worksheets

When it comes to building vocabulary, practice makes perfect! Download and print these vocabulary worksheets and support your child's understanding of new words. Not only will it improve reading fluency, but it will also boost writing skills. Once you've worked on vocabulary, check out all of our writing worksheets. Here are some other tips for building vocabulary skills:

  • Always keep a stack of index cards and markers handy for making vocabulary flash cards. They are especially useful for learning on the go.
  • Play the dictionary game with your child. Create a list of 5-10 words that your child does not know, either from their homework or their personal reading. Get two dictionaries and compete to see who can look up the word and write down its definition fastest. Come up with a fun reward for the person with the fastest time.
  • Make a pledge with your child to each learn one new word a day. You can tell each other about your word, and write down a sentence that uses it correctly. This is a great dinner table activity.

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely