September 7, 2015
|
by Angela Coleby

Lesson plan

All About Mr. Octopus

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Students will be able to discuss facts about the octopus. Students will be able to create and paint an octopus. Students will be able to conduct an experiment to demonstrate an octopus using ink.

(5 minutes)
  • Sing an octopus finger play song with class. For example: Eight arms crawling in the sea. I have no bones. I’m so slippery. (Lock thumbs together and wiggle the other eight fingers.) I see one crab. I’m so hungry. (Clap hands one time.) Eight arms crawling in the sea. I have no bones. I’m so slippery. (Lock thumbs together and wiggle other the eight fingers.) I see two crawfish. I’m so hungry. (Clap hands one time.) Eight arms crawling in the sea. I have no bones. I’m so slippery. (Lock thumbs together and wiggle other eight fingers.) I see three fish. I’m so hungry. (Clap hands one time.)
(10 minutes)
  • Ask students what they know about an octopus, the eight armed sea creature that has no bones.
  • Elaborate on answers they give.
  • Explain facts about the octopus. For example: Octopus begins with the letter O. It has no bones in its body. Its 8 feet are attached to its head. Octopi are very smart, and if threatened, they shoot an inky fluid that darkens the water. The octopus can also change color to gray, brown, pink, blue, or green to blend in with its surroundings. Octopi may also change color as a way to communicate with another octopus. They have suckers under their feet and like to eat crabs, crawfish, and fish.
(10 minutes)
  • Give each group a stone, a cup of water, and blue and red food coloring.
  • Instruct a student to place the stone in the water and pretend it is an animal about to attack an octopus.
  • Ask them what they think an octopus would do.
  • Allow other students in the group to act as an octopus squirting its ink by adding drops of food coloring.
  • Let them describe what is happening to the water. Relate it to how an octopus protects itself using its ink.
(15 minutes)
  • Give each student a bottle that is cut in half.
  • Tell students to use their scissors to make eight cuts along the bottom of the bottle. These will be the arms.
  • Have students paint the octopus one of the colors they can change into, such as gray, brown, pink, blue, or green.
  • Enrichment: Have advanced students paint circles under the octopus feet to represent suckers. Read the Octopus Facts worksheet to them for more information.
  • Support: Guide students who struggle with their cutting skills while cutting the octopus arms. Have them focus on drawing the octopus to visually understand what an octopus looks like.
(5 minutes)
  • Question students to gain an understanding of how well they understood the information. Potential questions include: What happens when an octopus feels threatened? Why might an octopus change colors?
  • Tell students to count the arms on their octopus craft to see if they have the correct number.
(5 minutes)
  • Ask students true or false questions to grasp their understanding of the octopus. For example: Is it true that an octopus has seven arms?

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