August 28, 2018
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by Mia Perez

Lesson plan

Analyzing Alliteration

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EL Adjustments
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Students will be able to identify texts containing alliteration.

The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments
(5 minutes)
  • Tell students that today we are going to analyze author's craft. Explain to students that author's craft is a set of decisions made by the author that make their writing look or sound a certain way.
  • Inform students that different examples of author's craft include figurative language such as similes, metaphors, onomatopoeia, and alliteration.
  • Write the following sentence on the board: "The blue bug bit a big black bear."
  • Call on a volunteer to identify which type of craft the author is using in this sentence.
  • Guide students to understand that this is an example of alliteration, which is the repetition of beginning consonant sounds in a group of closely connected words.
  • Tell students that today we are going to analyze alliteration.
(10 minutes)
  • Explain to students that with alliteration the words with the same beginning consonant sound can be right next to each other or spaced out, but generally at least two words are needed for alliteration.
  • Project the Wacky Alliteration worksheet onto the board.
  • Model how to complete numbers one through five by reading the sentences aloud and underlining the alliteration.
  • Direct students' attention to the second part of the Wacky Alliteration worksheet.
  • Read each sentence aloud and think aloud for students as you determine whether or not it contains alliteration (e.g., I noticed that this sentence has the L sound repeated so I am going to write "yes.").
  • Continue this process with the remainder of the worksheet.
(10 minutes)
  • Distribute the More Wacky Alliteration worksheet to each student and project a copy onto the board.
  • Read each sentence in the first half of the worksheet and pause after each sentence to allow students time to underline the alliteration.
  • Call on a volunteer to share their answers. Record their answers on the projected copy.
  • Read each sentence in the second half of the worksheet and pause after each sentence to allow students time to determine whether or not the sentence contains alliteration.
  • Call on volunteer to share their answers. Record their answers on the projected copy.
  • Encourage students to ask any clarifying questions they may have.
(18 minutes)
  • Preview and distribute the Wild and Wonderful Alliteration worksheet to each student.
  • Tell students that this worksheet has an extra challenge as they are being asked to write their own sentences using alliteration.
  • Instruct students to use the back of their worksheet to reflect upon the following questions:
    • Why does an author include alliteration in their writing? What is the purpose?
    • What is the effect on you as the reader?
    • In what types of writing would you see a lot of alliteration (e.g., novels, newspaper articles, poems, etc.)?

Support:

  • Allow students to focus on identifying alliteration as opposed to writing their own alliterative sentences during Independent Work Time.
  • Partner struggling readers with more advanced readers during Independent Work Time so that they can have the text read aloud to them as they work to circle the alliteration.
  • Provide students with sentence frames to assist them during the reflective writing activity (e.g., "An author includes alliteration in their writing because __," "It makes the reader feel __").

Enrichment:

  • Challenge students to come up with tricky tongue twisters as they are writing alliterative sentences during Independent Work Time.
  • Ask students to come up with a list of other types of author's crafts (e.g., personification and hyperbole) and reflect upon their purpose and effect on the reader during Independent Work Time.
(7 minutes)
  • Distribute a blank index card to each student.
  • Instruct students to write a sentence on the card. Tell the students they can write a sentence containing alliteration or a sentence that does not contain alliteration.
  • Tell students to exchange index cards with the person sitting next to them.
  • Ask each student to read the sentence aloud to the class and say whether or not the sentence contains alliteration.
  • Monitor students' answers to gauge understanding.
(5 minutes)
  • Tell students to turn to an elbow partner and discuss the questions that they responded to during Independent Work Time:
    • Why does an author include alliteration in their writing? What is the purpose?
    • What is the effect on you as the reader?
    • In what types of writing would you see a lot of alliteration (e.g., novels, newspaper articles, poems, etc.)?
  • Call on students to share their reflections.

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