July 6, 2017
|
by Anna Whaley

Lesson plan

Combining Words

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  • Students will be able to identify words that can be used to form hyphenated words and contractions.
  • Students will be able to combine words to form hyphenated words and contractions.
(5 minutes)
  • Invite each student to take a word card out of a brown paper bag.
  • Tell the students that their task is to find their group by looking for students that have similar words.
  • Give the students a few minutes to mingle around the room and form groups.
  • Ask each group to share the words that they grouped together.
  • As each group shares, write the words on the board.
  • Tell the students that they will be learning how to find separate words in sentences that can be condensed to form single words. These types of words are hyphenated compound words and contractions.
(10 minutes)
  • On a piece of chart paper, write a sentence that contains words that can be condensed to create a hyphenated compound word (suggested Sentence: “Next week I will go to the doctor so that he can follow up with me to make sure the medicine is working.”).
  • Highlight the words that can be used to create a hyphenated word and show the students how you can change the sentence to condense and be more specific. (Suggested Sentence: “I will go to the doctor for a follow-up appointment next week.”)
  • Remind the students that "is," "have," "not," and "will" can be used to make a variety of contractions.
  • Using the same procedure, show the students how you can locate and highlight two words in a sentence that can be used to make a contraction. (Suggested Sentence: “Jessie should not go outside because there is thunder and lightning.”)
  • Demonstrate the process of rewriting the sentence with the combined words. (Suggested Sentence: “Jessie shouldn’t go outside because there’s thunder and lightning.”)
(10 minutes)
  • On the board, write the following list of words for students to use as a word bank during their guided practice work: know-it-all, father-in-law, life-size, It’s, they’ve, couldn’t, we’ll)
  • Divide students into groups of three or four.
  • Distribute one sentence strip and highlighter to each group.
  • Tell the students that their task is to find the words that can be combined and to rewrite the sentence on the blank sentence strip.
  • After all groups have finished, invite a speaker from each group to share the group’s work with the rest of the class.
  • Place the sentence strip in a pocket chart or tape it onto the board.
(10 minutes)
  • Ask the students to complete the Word Combos worksheet.
  • Circulate around the room to assist students as needed.

Enrichment:

  • Challenge students with more difficult hyphenated words (able-bodied, one-sided, well-to-do, self-service, front-runner). Ask students to practice using these words in context on an individual whiteboard.

Support:

  • For students who have difficulty finding and pairing words on the Word Combos worksheet, provide students with a word bank of the words used, written on a sticky note.
  • Instead of having the students do a paper version of this activity, use a shared document and allow students to edit --- highlighting words that can be combined and writing new words.
(10 minutes)
  • Ask the students to complete the Pairing Up Words worksheet.
  • Check to see that students correctly pair words and use in appropriate contexts.
(10 minutes)
  • End the lesson with a brainstorming game.
  • Divide students into two groups and ask them to form two lines facing the whiteboard.
  • Tell the students that their task is to create five combined words as a group.
  • Each person will write a part of a word and pass the marker off to the next person.
  • When the group has five words, the group should sit down to show that they are finished.
  • After playing the game, lead the class in a brief discussion about how to combine words to make hyphenated compound words and contractions.

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