August 22, 2018
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by Kerry McKee

EL Support Lesson

Compare and Contrast Fictional Characters

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Compare and Contrast with Wolves lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Compare and Contrast with Wolves lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to compare and contrast fictional characters from a familiar story.

Language

Students will be able to compare and contrast fictional characters with grade-level words, verb phrases, and adjectives using visuals, sentence frames, and partner support.

(5 minutes)
  • Gather students on the rug and ask them to give you a thumbs up if they have ever read or heard of the story, "The Three Little Pigs."
  • Remind students that the characters in a story are the people or animals in the story. Characters are who the story is about.
  • Ask students to give you a thumbs up if they know any of the characters in "The Three Little Pigs."
  • Call on student volunteers to identify the main characters in "The Three Little Pigs"—the three pigs and the wolf.
  • Remind students that readers have thoughts as they read that help them to understand the story better.
  • Tell students that today they will be thinking about how the characters in "The Three Little Pigs" are the same, and how they are different.
(10 minutes)
  • Frontload vocabulary by distributing a copy of the Vocabulary worksheet from The Book that Cried Wolf workbook to each student.
  • Model sounding out the words on the right, and prompt students to point to the corresponding picture on the left.
  • Distribute a copy of The Three Little Pigs: A Rebus Story from The Book that Cried Wolf workbook to each student.
  • Read the story chorally as a class, having students use the vocabulary sheet as a reference as you read.
  • Think aloud about one way that the pigs in the story were the same. For example, they are all pigs, or they all built houses.
  • Tell students that you just compared two characters. Explain that when you compare, you think about how things are the same, or what they have in common.
  • Think aloud about one way that the pigs were different, or not the same. For example, one pig built his house out of straw, and the other built his house out of bricks.
  • Share that you just contrasted two characters. Explain that when you contrast, you think about how things are different.
(10 minutes)
  • Have students think about the first and second pig. Ask students to compare by describing what these pigs did that was the same. Display the following sentence frame:
    • The first and second pig both ____.
  • Students should turn and talk to a partner about how the pigs were the same. Choose a volunteer to share a completed sentence frame (ie. "The first and second pig both built houses.")
  • Tell students that when you contrast objects, you describe how they are different. Display the following sentence frame:
    • The first pig ____, but the second pig ____.
  • Students can turn and talk to a partner about how the pigs were different. Choose a volunteer to share a completed sentence frame (ie. "The first pig built a house out of straw, but the second pig built a house out of sticks.")
  • Ask students what adjectives could be used to describe the first and second pig based on the way they act. Display the sentence frame:
    • Both the first and second pig were ____.
  • Call on volunteers to suggest adjectives, such as lazy, unmotivated or tired. Record adjectives in a word bank on the board, and have the students describe the pigs using the sentence frame and word bank with a partner.
(10 minutes)
  • Remind the students that the third pig was different.
  • Have students describe the third pig to a partner using the sentence frame, "The third pig ____." Call on volunteers to share ideas such as the third pig built his house from brick, and that he tricked the wolf.
  • Brainstorm adjectives with students such as smart, hardworking, and tricky to describe the third pig based on his actions. Add the adjectives to the word bank.
  • Have students work with a partner to compare and contrast the third pig with his brothers using the following sentence frame:
    • The first and second pig were ____, but the third pig was ____.

BEGINNING

  • Have students work in a teacher-led small group.
  • Provide the story in student's home language (L1) if possible.
  • Have students act out the actions and adjectives found in the story to improve comprehension.

ADVANCED

  • Have students compare one of the pigs to the wolf using the sentence frames.
  • Challenge students to write a paragraph comparing and contrasting two characters from the story.
(2 minutes)
  • Ask students to answer the following questions using the sentence stems provided:
    • How were the first and the second pig the same?
      • "The first and the second pig both ____."
    • How were the three pigs different?
      • "The first and the second pig ____, but the third pig ____."
(3 minutes)
  • Call on students to describe a favorite character from the story.

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