September 23, 2018
|
by Sarah Sumnicht

EL Support Lesson

Parts of Speech that Describe

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Varsity Parts of Speech Review lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Varsity Parts of Speech Review lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to name and use articles, prepositions, adverbs, and superlative adjectives.

Language

Students will be able to comprehend a fiction text with adjectives and adverbs using word banks.

(2 minutes)
  • Show students an item, like a ball. Pass it around and give them a moment to look at it and feel it.
  • Write a noun on the board to label the item (e.g., "ball"). Give students a moment to talk about what they noticed with a partner. Then, ask students to call out words that describe it (e.g., round, squishy, red). Record their answers on the board.
  • Perform an action with the item (e.g., roll or bounce the ball). Write a verb on the board to describe the action. Give students another moment to talk with a partner. Then, ask students to describe the action (e.g., slowly, softly, on the floor). Record their answers on the board.
  • Explain that the words that the students used to describe the ball and its action are parts of speech. Provide a student-friendly definition (e.g., "categories of words that are used to make a sentence") and then label the parts of speech on the board (e.g., "noun," "verb," "adjective," "adverb").
  • Tell students that they will be studying two parts of speech that focus on description, adjectives and adverbs.
(10 minutes)
  • Draw an adapted Frayer Model on a sheet of chart paper. Write a key term at the top of the chart (e.g., "noun") with a student-friendly definition below. Then draw two columns under the definition. Label one column "examples" and the second "non-examples."
  • Repeat for each of the three other parts of speech ("verb," "adjective," "adverb") so that you have four charts. (Note: you may add "bullets" to each column so that there are green checkmark bullets for examples and red X bullets for the non-examples.)
  • Model how to fill in a couple of examples and non-examples for one of the key words (e.g. "noun example: ball," "noun non-example: bounce").
  • Hang the charts in four corners of the room and lead students through a carousel activity:
    • Have students count off to four to form groups. Then, assign each group a key word. Provide a different color marker for each group.
    • Tell groups to discuss the key term on their chart and record as many examples and non-examples for the term as they can.
    • After one minute, signal the groups to move to the next chart. Give groups one minute at each subsequent chart to discuss and record their answers.
    • Once students have returned to their original chart, invite each group to read aloud their key term, definition, and examples. Correct any errors or misconceptions and leave the charts posted for the duration of the lesson.
(10 minutes)
  • Hand out the worksheet Parts of Speech: Words that Describe and review the information box about nouns and adjectives.
  • As a class, generate a list of adjectives to make a word bank at the top of the worksheet. Write student-generated words on a displayed copy of the worksheet and tell students to copy the words onto their own word bank.
  • Complete two example sentences as a model for students. Then, instruct students to complete the remaining sentences with a partner. Invite students to share their answers and correct misconceptions as needed.
  • Review the information box at the top of the second page (adverbs and verbs).
  • Complete one sentence as an example. Then instruct students to complete the rest of the worksheet with their partner. Invite students to share their answers and correct misconceptions as needed.
(10 minutes)
  • Hand out the story "The Secret Garden." Display and read the story aloud as students follow along. Provide student-friendly definitions for new vocabulary words as needed after the first read. (Note: you will need the text only; the question section may be removed.)
  • Tell students that they will be reading the story a second time with a partner and they will be looking for adjectives and adverbs.
  • Read the first paragraph aloud and model how to identify adverbs and adjectives in the text. Circle adjectives in red (e.g., "beautiful," "old") and adverbs in blue (e.g., "faster," "tremendously"). As you model, point out and underline which nouns and verbs are being described.
  • Instruct students to read the second paragraph with a partner and circle two adjectives in red and two adverbs in blue.
  • Call on students to give examples of adjectives and adverbs from the story. Instruct them to read the full sentence aloud, and then identify the descriptive word in the sentence. Circle students' adjectives and adverbs on the displayed copy of the worksheet. Correct misconceptions as needed.

BEGINNING

  • Pre-teach additional vocabulary terms (e.g., "astonished") and idiomatic phrases (e.g., "skip to a hundred") that students will see within the text. Offer home language (L1) definitions if applicable.
  • Allow beginning ELs to use bilingual resources to define new words throughout the lesson.
  • Strategically pair beginning ELs with more advanced ELs or students who speak the same home language.
  • Use a shorter text, with fewer tier two words, in place of "The Secret Garden."

ADVANCED

  • Allow advanced ELs to utilize a glossary, thesaurus, and dictionary for help with unfamiliar words.
  • Choose advanced ELs to share their ideas first in group and class discussions. Ask advanced ELs to add on, rephrase, or clarify what their peers say in class discussion.
  • Have advanced ELs repeat instructions and key vocabulary as they summarize important information for the class.
(5 minutes)
  • Write a sentence on the board that contains an adjective and an adverb (e.g., "I carefully poured the brown sugar into a bowl.").
  • Do a choral reading of the sentence. Then, ask students to find an adjective in the sentence.
  • Have students record their answer on a personal whiteboard and invite them to hold up their answer. Scan student answers to gauge understanding, then have students shout out the answer. In red, circle the word "brown" in the sentence.
  • Have students turn and talk with a partner about what noun the adjective was describing ("sugar"). Call on a student to share the answer and underline it in the sentence.
  • Ask students to find an adverb in the sentence and write it on their own personal whiteboard. Scan student answers to gauge understanding, then have students shout out the answer. Circle the word "carefully" in blue in the sentence.
  • Have students turn and talk with a partner about what verb the adverb was describing ("poured"). Call on a student to share the answer and underline it in the sentence.
  • Repeat with several sentences.
(3 minutes)
  • Direct students' attention back to the adapted Frayer Models for the key terms "adjective" and "adverb" (from the Word Level Focus activity).
  • Ask students to think of additional examples and non-examples to add to each list. Allow students to talk with a partner or small group before calling on volunteers. If needed, prompt students by providing a noun or verb for them to describe.

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