October 1, 2017
|
by Mia Perez

Lesson Plan

See It, Don't Say It!

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Students will be able to identify and read words with the silent letter combinations wr, kn, and mb.

(5 minutes)
  • Tell students that today you will be talking about silent letters.
  • Explain that silent letters are letters that are spelled but are not pronounced. These letters can come at the beginning, middle, and end of words.
  • Write the following sentence on the board: “I knit you a glove that covers you from your thumb to your wrist.”
  • Ask students to come to the board and circle words that contain silent letters.
  • Support students to see that there are three silent letters in this sentence: the K in knit, the B in thumb, and the W in wrist.
(10 minutes)
  • Explain that there are silent letter rules that will help you recognize when letters should be silent.
  • Tell students that there are many silent letters and many rules, but today we are focus on three letters and rules.
  • Write these three rules at the top of the board: the letter K is silent when it comes before the N at the beginning of a word (kn), the letter B is silent when it comes after the M at the end of a word (mb), and the letter W is silent with comes before the R at the beginning of a word (wr). Leave space under each rule.
  • Ask students to brainstorm a list of words following these three silent letter rules. Write the list of words under each rule.
(15 minutes)
  • Distribute whiteboards to each student.
  • Tell students that you will say different words and sentences aloud and they will write down what you say on their whiteboards and then hold them up to show you.
  • Say words, one at a time, that contain silent letters following the three rules stated above (e.g., knight, lamb, and wrinkle). Ask students to hold up their whiteboards after writing each word so that you can check to see that they are writing each word with the correct silent letters.
  • Say sentences, one at a time, that contain words with silent letters (e.g., "Stop cracking your knuckles!" "The plumber fixed the toilet;" "Did you wrap her birthday present?"). Ask students to write the sentence and hold up their whiteboards so that you can check to see that they are writing each word with the correct silent letters.
(20 minutes)
  • Show students the Silent Letter Search worksheet and have them complete it independently.

Support:

  • Use a notecard to break up the story from the Silent Letter Search into manageable sections.

Enrichment:

  • Ask students to think of other examples of silent letters. Ask students to write down examples of words with these silent letters and the rule that they follow (e.g. the N is silent when it comes after M at the end of a word as in column and solemn).
(5 minutes)
  • Using a small whiteboard, write a word with one of the silent letter combinations that you have been focusing on today (e.g., wreckage).
  • Ask students to read the word aloud as a class.
  • Continue to write different words, but vary the ways in which your students respond. For example, ask only the boys to respond or ask students sitting in the middle row to respond.
(5 minutes)
  • Have students think-pair-share the Three Ws.
  • Ask them to think about what (what they learned about today), so what (why it is useful) , and now what? (how it fits into what they are learning and where they are going with their learning).
  • Ask students to share their ideas with a neighbor and then call on students to share their ideas with the class.

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