Cylinders Resources

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28 filtered results
Cylinders
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Plane and Solid Shapes
Plane and Solid Shapes
Worksheet
Plane and Solid Shapes
Challenge your young mathematician with some solid shapes like cubes, pyramids, prisms and cones!
1st grade
Math
Worksheet
Cylinder Shape
Cylinder Shape
Worksheet
Cylinder Shape
A cylinder is a 3-D shape that appears in many everyday things. Help your child learn about cylinders by identifying the shape in her surroundings.
1st grade
Math
Worksheet
Cones and Cylinders
Cones and Cylinders
Worksheet
Cones and Cylinders
Believe it or not, geometry is everywhere! Find the cones and cylinders in this group of pictures.
1st grade
Math
Worksheet

Cylinders Resources

A basic curvilinear shape, the cylinder has been studied for thousands of years. Your students will quickly understand the two main components of a right circular cylinder: circular ends perpendicular to a central axis. Teachers and students alike will appreciate the Education.com worksheets and games provided below, which cover details and provide examples of the dimensions of a cylinder.

Learn More About Cylinders

While scholars have studied the cylinder for a long time, your students might be new to the concept. You can help them immediately understand the basic principles of a cylinder by presenting them with common objects such as a can of soda, or a container of tennis balls.

Cylinder lesson plans should include two important cylinder formulas. To calculate the exact properties of a cylinder, students will need to understand how to use exponents, in addition to following the rules of PEMDAS. You may need to define the variables h and r to students before covering the following:

Volume: V = πr2h

Surface area is divided into three parts:
  • the top: πr2
  • the bottom: πr2
  • the side: 2πrh
There are other, more advanced cylinder formulas, but volume and surface area are great starting points for many students. There are also different types of cylinders: open ends on a cylinder make it an “open cylinder,” while flat surfaces on either end grant the name “solid cylinder.”

If you introduce cylinders to your students using representations such as a barrel or can, they should be able to grasp that cylinders have both an axis and circular ends. From there, you can further break down a cylinder into top, bottom, and side.

Once your students are able to comprehend the surface area of the ends and side, they will only need to make a slight shift in mindset to calculate cylinder volume. Use the Education.com resources above to help your students open up a whole new can of cylinder knowledge.