Informational Writing Resources

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Informational Writing
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Fourth Grade Independent Study Packet - Week 7
Fourth Grade Independent Study Packet - Week 7
Workbook
Fourth Grade Independent Study Packet - Week 7
This independent study packet brings you Week 7 of hands-on activities for fourth graders to engage in from home.
4th grade
Science
Workbook
Make a City Guide For Kids!
Make a City Guide For Kids!
Activity
Make a City Guide For Kids!
Does your child know all the greatest kid-friendly places in town? Here's an activity that lets them create a cool city guide and work their writing chops, too!
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Activity

Informational Writing Resources

Just the facts, ma'am (or sir). If your students need help with informational writing, put these Education.com resources to use. From preschool to middle school, these worksheets and lesson plans teach students how to write nonfiction starting with basic sentences and working up to short essays. For an imaginative twist on writing, head over to our creative writing resources.
Informational writing, like functional writing, is not creative in nature, but instead focuses on facts related to a topic. There are several core concepts students should understand in order to tackle informational writing. Students can practice these concepts using the resources provided above by Education.com.
Labels
A label is simply a word or set of words that identify something. Teaching students informational writing can start as early as Kindergarten. Showing them a picture and having them use words to accurately describe the picture teaches them how to label something.
Fact Statements
Once the students understand how to generate a label, have them expand on the label with fact statements. Using our picture strategy, a fact statement is a single clause that expands on what is in the picture with something that is factual and related to the picture. This teaches the children to expand on the label while staying relevant.
Fact Lists
Once they are able to generate a fact statement, they can move on to generating a fact list. A fact list is simply a list of fact statements. In a fact list the clauses that the student comes up with are independent and can be read in any order without losing any meaning.
Couplets
Couplets expand on fact lists making them read more fluently. While the fact statements in a couplet can be independent as a clause, the overall meaning is dependent on the their placement within the list of other facts. This could be in a question/answer or a statement/example format.