Point of View in Fiction Texts

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55 filtered results
Analyzing Point of View
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Vocabulary Cards: Shifting Points of View
Vocabulary Cards: Shifting Points of View
Worksheet
Vocabulary Cards: Shifting Points of View
Use these vocabulary cards with the EL Support Lesson: Shifting Points of View.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Re-imagining Conclusions with Guest Characters
Re-imagining Conclusions with Guest Characters
Worksheet
Re-imagining Conclusions with Guest Characters
Use this graphic organizer with your students to reflect and re-imagine story endings with characters from their favorite tales.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Prairie Girl Character Traits
Prairie Girl Character Traits
Worksheet
Prairie Girl Character Traits
Historic novels are rich sources of reading practice and this graphic organizer is a nod to prairie classics like those written by Laura Ingalls Wilder.
2nd grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Circle of Viewpoints
Circle of Viewpoints
Worksheet
Circle of Viewpoints
Use this graphic organizer to support your students as they distinguish their own viewpoint from those of characters in a fiction text.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Frank's First Day at School
Frank's First Day at School
Story
Frank's First Day at School
Frank stars in a story about overcoming Back to School jitters.
2nd grade
Reading & Writing
Story

Point of View in Fiction Texts

Learning characters’ points of view in fictional texts teaches students to understand other points of view in the real world. The resource library has a diverse mix of teacher-created lesson plans and skills-based printable worksheets and workbooks available to employ this important component of reading comprehension. Kids can learn the difference of first, second, and third person, how to interpret characters' feelings and other tools that will enhance reading enjoyment and create empathy, too.

In Someone Else’s Shoes: Resources on Point of View

What are the villain's motives? Why is protagonist so determined? Is the sidekick actually trying to deceive the hero? When older students start to discover point of view in fiction, the stories become more textured and enjoyable to read. Education.com’s Learning Library equips parents and teachers with the tools to boost student reading capabilities with selected printable worksheets, lesson plans, and popular workbooks.

The dozens of worksheets available teach students how to analyze themes and understand plot clues. Creating character trading cards is an inventive way to inspect individual personas. Kids will be able to decipher who the narrator is and what person they are speaking. Other worksheets have advanced students take a careful look at word choice to draw inferences.

The Read Between the Lines workbook for first graders is full of assignments on drawing inferences including cause and effect practice and interpreting images. The Shifting Points of View lesson plan includes practice comparing works of fiction and nonfiction and language differences between first and third person. This lesson plan serves as a resource for English language learners, too. Excited students will know what it’s like to walk a mile in someone else’s shoes with the variety of tools on points of view available in the Learning Library.