Science Project:

Do Pianists Type Faster Than Non-Pianists?

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Research Questions:

How does the brain control the skeletal system? The muscular system?

Being an experienced pianist takes practice. It requires hand-to-eye coordination when you read music, training both hands to move separately, and you also to throw hearing into the mix. It is not something easy to do and to accomplish in a short time.

Typing efficiently is a mighty skill to have today as technology is taking over manuscript. Many companies have jobs where it requires their employees to type at or faster than a said amount of words per minute (wpm).

Materials:

  • A passage for your test subjects to copy and type out
  • Test subjects (at least 50: 25 pianists and 25 non-pianists of similar ages)
  • A computer with word processing program
  • Timer
  • Pen and paper

Experimental Procedure

  1. Ask your test subjects these survey questions: Do you play the piano? How long have you been playing? How often do you practice? What is the fastest tempo that you can play?
  2. According to the answer, split your test subjects into two groups: those that play piano and those that don't.
  3. Test your subjects individually.
  4. Hand them the passage to copy and type out in a word processing program.
  5. Time how long it takes them to type all of it out. Record this.
  6. Repeat steps 3-5 for all your test subjects.
  7. Find the average time it took for both groups to type the passage out. Compare which one was faster.

Suggested Chart

Test Subject

Typing Time
Pianists
Test Subject #1

#2

#3

Non-Pianists
Test Subject #1

#2

#3

Terms/Concepts: Human hands; Muscle & Skeletal Movement; Nervous System; Coordination

References:

Author: Sofia PC
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