Science Fair Project:

Dry Ice Effects

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Research Questions:

  • What temperature is dry ice?
  • What is dry ice composed of?
  • How do you make dry ice?

Most people know dry ice is used for fog at parties or in movie scenes. In this experiment you will become familiar with the properties of dry ice and create interesting effects.

Materials:

  • Dry ice
  • Water
  • Large bowl
  • Bubble solution
  • Dishwashing liquid
  • Plastic water bottle
  • Dishrag

Experimental Procedure

  • Tiny Bubbles
  1. Fill the large bowl with warm water.
  2. Pour in some bubble solution.
  3. Drop the dry ice into it
  4. Watch as it quickly begins to make a countless amount of bubbles.
  • Balloon Pop
  1. Put a medium sized chunk of dry ice into the plastic bottle.
  2. Pour water into the bottle.
  3. Quickly put the balloon over the bottle head.
  4. Watch as the gas from the dry ice fills the balloon and causes it to pop.
  • Big Bubble
  1. Fill the large bowl with warm water.
  2. Pour in some bubble solution.
  3. Drop some dry ice into the bowl.
  4. Pour some dishwashing liquid onto the dishrag.
  5. Run it under some warm water.
  6. Slide the dish rag along the rim of the bowl, covering it with a film of dishwashing liquid.
  7. Watch as the gas fills the film and forms one giant bubble.

Terms/Concepts: dry ice, carbon dioxide. elements in all three forms of matter (solid, liquid, gas)

References: Dry Ice: http://www.dryiceinfo.com/

Author: Danielle Abadam
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