Science Fair Project:

Does Texting Enhance Finger Dexterity?

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  • Do frequent users of cell phone text messaging capabilities have better finger dexterity compared to people that rarely use this modern means of communication?

Smartphone technology has changed the way people communicate with one another. For some, text messaging has become a primary mode of interacting with others. In this experiment, students will investigate whether text messaging has the unique side effect of enhancing finger dexterity.

  • Finger dexterity test (eg, O’Connor dexterity test or other comparable test)
  • 50 test subjects (25 frequent texters, 25 people who rarely use text messaging)
  • Notebook for recording and analyzing results

  1. Recruit test subjects for your study. The participants should be around the same age.
  2. Ask test subjects to record the number of texts they send each day for a week.
  3. Divide your test subjects into two groups. You will want approximately 25 people who text frequently (several times an hour) and 25 people who rarely text (5 times per day or less).
  4. Ask each test subject to complete the finger dexterity test. Record the time it takes for each subject to complete the test.
  5. Analyze your results. What is the average time it takes for people who text frequently to complete the test? How does this compare to the average time of the group that rarely uses text messaging?

Terms/Concepts: finger dexterity; text messaging; O’Connor Finger Dexterity Test

Author: Megan Doyle
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