Word Morphology: Word Lists with Prefixes "dia" and "per"

Word Morphology: Word Lists with Prefixes "dia" and "per"

Word morphology is the study of words, how they are formed, and their relationship to other words. As your child studies words and word parts, ask him to keep a journal of the interesting words he learns. Read through his word list together and look for words with common prefixes or suffixes.
Understanding root words and their meanings is a foundational piece of language. This is crucial as students read more complex texts and come across unfamiliar words. Support your students by having them create a Root Word Dictionary to keep track of a variety of root words and their meanings.

Area, Perimeter, Volume, & the Coordinate Plane

Area, Perimeter, Volume, & the Coordinate Plane

Make math personal! Try using data that your child cares about to plot points on a coordinate plane. For example, you might help your child make a graph showing how much she has grown or plot points showing how much candy costs per pound at the candy store. Or, invite your child to draw a 'blueprint' of your family home on graph paper. Then ask them to find the area and perimeter of each room on their drawing, using the square units as measurements.
Inspire creativity through math! Invite your students to design their dream home. Hand out graph paper and have students draw a blueprint of their imagined house. Encourage them to include whatever rooms they want, like a video game room, a movie theater, or an indoor pool! Then, have them find the area and perimeter of each room. To add a STEM challenge, have students build their home as a 3-D model, and ask them to find the volume of each room in their model.

Perspective, Opinion, & Narrator's Point of View

Perspective, Opinion, & Narrator's Point of View

Look for examples of author's purpose in the real world. For example, when you are driving, ask your child to identify the purpose of a billboard or a road sign. At the grocery store, compare the purpose behind the nutrition label on a box of cereal versus the fun description on the back of the box.
As students identify the author's purpose and narrator's point of view, make sure that they are able to justify their thinking with evidence from the text. Help them find cue words, loaded words, and direct quotes combined with their own inference skills.

Argument Writing in Formal Letters

Argument Writing in Formal Letters

Many written arguments come in the form of letters. Encourage your child to write a persuasive letter to someone about a cause they care about. For example, she might choose to write to the NFL asking for increased safety on the field, or she could write to a television network asking for more shows with strong female leads.
Many written arguments come in the form of letters. Present your students with a controversial letter and have them write a persuasive letter in response. For example, you might write a letter to your students saying that they will have twice as much homework for the rest of the school year. Review the format of a letter before asking them to write their response.
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