Homophones

Homophones

Your child will have fun with homophones - words that sound the same but have different meanings. Choose a pair of homophones and ask your child to use each word in a sentence. This is a great way to see if your child truly understands the meaning of these tricky words!
Homophone activities are a fun way for fourth graders to build upon their vocabulary and test their understanding of a word's meaning. Merging spelling skills and use of context clues into one activity is a great way to address this skill. Your students will have fun working with words that sound the same but have different meanings.

Long Division with 1-Digit Divisors

Long Division with 1-Digit Divisors

You and your child can practice solving long division problems wiht the partial quotient method. If your child is stuck, work together to read through the example on one of the partial quotient activities. As you and your child work with this conceptually-based model, talk about place value and estimation. This strategy proves challenging at first, but it ultimately helps kids "see" the different parts of a long division problem.
Remind your fourth graders that division is a "sharing" operation where objects are shared (or divided) into a number of groups of equal number. Integrate activities that assess their understanding of both the standard algorithm and conceptually-based models. The partial quotient strategy, for example, is a great way for kids to use mental math and estimation when solving for a quotient!

Deep Comprehension

Deep Comprehension

Select one of these reading comprehension activities to work on with your child. Remind your child that she should be self-monitoring for understanding during all stages of the reading process, as well as reflecting on the main idea of her texts. Regardless of the type of reading comprehension activity, kids should be looking beyond surface-level comprehension at this point in the school year.
Integrate these activities into your comprehension strategy instruction! Probing questions and metacognitive strategies teach young readers how to self-monitor for understanding during all stages of the reading process, as well as dig deep into their texts. Regardless of the type of reading comprehension activity, kids should be looking beyond surface-level comprehension at this point in the school year.

Including Transitions in Literary Essays

Including Transitions in Literary Essays

Strong writers lead into their evidence with transitional phrases, and explain why this evidence matters. Help your child elevate his writing style by reading through the transitional words and phrases on the reference page of the "Practice Using Transitions" activity. Then, grab a book, possibly the one your child is currently reading, and read a page together—searching for sentences that incorporate these seamless transitions.
Strong writers lead into their evidence with transitional phrases, and explain why this evidence matters. Help your students elevate their writing style by providing them with examples of transitional words and phrases, as well as mentor writing pieces. They will need ample scaffolding and practice in order to learn how to write in this smooth and cohesive manner.
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