Social Emotional Development Educational and Parenting Articles

Browse social emotional development educational and parenting articles. Browse all our articles by topic and grade, or use the search.
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Second graders are rapidly maturing and establishing identities for themselves. They are learning to think smarter, be more social and take care of themselves, but they're still young kids with kid-like emotions, and you're still a parent who should know what to do. Learn what's happening with your child's emotions, and take a few of our tips.
Toys come in all shapes and sizes, and range from simple classics like dollhouses and toy trucks to complex products designed to engage, amuse, and distract. But when faced with a toystore full of options, how's a parent to choose? Take a look at these five toys that stand the test of time.
Here are five ways to get started fostering the important skill of sharing in your preschooler.
Making the jump to kindergarten is a huge milestone for children. They are well aware that they are growing up, and they're eager to learn new things and take on new responsibilities. But while their school lives are moving faster than ever, they are still at an early stage of emotional development, which can make kindergarten a complicated, confusing time—for you and your kid. Learn what emotional characteristics you can expect, and get a few tips on what you can do about them.
You may have thought your child was social before, but you haven't seen anything yet! Second grade is the year when children truly become social creatures. They become immersed in their school lives, withdrawing from adults and forming circles of friends. For children, this is very exciting but also comes with some stress. For parents, it means that a whole new set of parenting skills need mastering. Read on to find out what happens in the social lives of second graders and how you can help your kid through this important developmental stage.
Read about social-emotional learning (SEL) in school's and its effects on the emotional intelligence of students.
Here are expert ideas from a child psychologist for helping your preschooler play with others.
By preschool, children identify themselves as male or female, and gender differences in their behavior may already be apparent.
There's a lot going on for third graders. School's getting tougher, their bodies are growing quickly and they're establishing an identity for themselves. Perhaps their biggest focus, however, is their social life. Their friendships become closer and more complex. They look past the adults in their lives and they look forward to seeing their friends, many of whom may stick around for years to come. It's an exciting time for them. For parents, there's a whole new set of things to know. Read this slideshow to learn about the social development of your third grader.
Wondering about your fifth grader's social life?  Here's the skinny on what's going on
Parents often feel helpless watching their kids struggle to make friends or fit in at school, whether it's because of clumsy social skills, an emotional problem or just bad luck. There's little you as a parent can do to suddenly make other kids like your child. But you can guide her down the right path and put her in positions to succeed socially. Read on to learn some of the keys to improving the social skills of your kid and giving her the best opportunities to meet new friends.
Back to school season can be tough for shy children, but parents can take concrete steps to help their shrinking violets to blossom. Here's how.
'Bang, bang! You're dead!' Whether it's fake sword fighting, pretend gunplay, or a superhero scene recreated, parents may cringe at the idea of make-believe violence where kids pretend to kill each other. But there's more to pretend play than meets the eye, which is part of the reason you can't stop kids from doing it. Learn what pretend play means to children, and find out when you should step in.
'Does not play well with others.' Parents fear hearing this from a teacher. We all want our kids to grow up with a good circle of friends, and playing is key for young children. The good news is that almost all kids struggle to play with others as they negotiate the balance between their desires and that of others. It's normal. And as a parent, you can do plenty of things to help your child learn to play well with others. Check out these tips and your social butterfly will grow his wings in no time!
Picture a fourth grader immersed in a book or journal. Was the child you imagined male or female?  You probably saw a girl â and your guess was probably right.
Social Emotional Learning is a new trend in whole child education that's gaining traction. Here's what you need to know about Social Emotional Learning.
Wondering about your fourth grader's social life?  Here's the skinny on what's going on.
If you thought the end of kindergarten meant the end of all the arguments, tantrums, crying, ups, downs and in-betweens, we've got bad news for you. Children in first grade are bound to endure a storm of emotional whirlwinds. Some of it makes sense and some of it doesn't, but how you react can help your child through this stage of life. Check out this slideshow to find out what your first grader will do and what you should do.
Browse social emotional development educational and parenting articles. Browse all our articles by topic and grade, or use the search.

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