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Physical Milestones: Kindergarten

Physical Milestones: Kindergarten

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Updated on Mar 6, 2009

"Mom, mom, watch this!" We’ve heard this phrase a million times. We watch and approve, but are we really paying attention? Every child has different strengths and weaknesses when it comes to motor skills, fitness, and social development. The new school year is coming fast. But there are still a few more weeks of summer to get your child ready. Here's a breakdown of what a kindergartener should be able to do physically, so you can keep your child on track:

Motor Skills

Kindergarteners are always on the go. All this energy gives them an opportunity to explore how their body moves and its limits. Your child should be able to:

  • perform locomotor skills, including running, jumping, leaping, sliding, and skipping
  • move in a variety of pathways (straight, curved, zig zag, and circle)
  • throw a ball, which may sometimes involve stepping with the same foot as the throwing hand
  • catch a ball with two hands, and drop and catch a bounced ball
  • balance on one foot for a short period of time, and keep balance while transferring weight
  • kick a stationary ball
  • imitate the movements of a variety of animals

Fitness

Fitness is fun for little ones. Keep them motivated! Your child should be able to:
  • engage in one to two minutes of moderate to intense physical activities leading to increased heart rate, breathing, and perspiration
  • possess strength to lift and support ones own body weight for a variety of activities (hopping, jumping, hanging)
  • demonstrate deep and slow breathing to relax
  • perform between 3 and 8 push ups
  • while lying on stomach, raise the chest at least 6 inches off the floor
  • perform between 2 and 10 stomach crunches with good form

Social Development

Kindergarteners like to play with friends. Your child should be able to:
  • communicate cooperatively with peers
  • appropriately respond to feedback and use it to try to improve
  • frequently assist and encourage others
  • accept and respond appropriately to the decisions of the teacher, parent, or person in charge
  • contribute to a small group effort without being prompted
  • perform activities with appropriate self-control and follow the rules
Don’t worry if your child is having a difficult time in one or more of these areas. What's important is that you're exposing them to activities that lead to improvement. Always remember, kids want to have fun and be active!
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