Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
Black Friday sale on now! Save 50% on PLUS and Brainzy with coupon BLACKFRI. Learn More

The 8 Characteristics of Motivated Kids

The 8 Characteristics of Motivated Kids

Related Articles

Related Topics

based on 66 ratings
By
Updated on Aug 27, 2013

Fostering motivation—a child’s desire and drive to succeed—is a universal challenge for teachers and parents. A “well-motivated child” is a pleasure to teach. His hand shoots into the air during class discussions. He can’t wait for that science lab, writing workshop, or even formal test. In fact, he’ll cheerfully take on one challenge after another, handle setbacks, and keep moving forward, even if results aren’t perfect.

Unfortunately, research indicates that he can also be pretty rare. In a recent survey by the National Education Association, for example, teachers said that in general, approximately 60% of their students were “disengaged” or “unmotivated.” In practical terms, that’s a lot of demoralized kids, with plenty of frustrated teachers and parents looking on. So is there any way out of the impasse? Absolutely, says renowned author and lecturer, Richard Lavoie, Ed.D. In over 30 years as a teacher and headmaster of residential schools for children with learning disabilities, Lavoie watched thousands of students struggle to stay engaged. His latest book, The Motivation Breakthrough, builds on those experiences to offer practical, research-based tools. He says that all children are motivated in some way, but adults need to help motivate them. “Kids just don’t come loaded with [motivation] batteries. You’ve got to be ready to put them in.”

So let’s say you want to help your child join the ranks of those eager beavers who just can’t get enough time in class. Lavoie started his research where most of us would: by reviewing professional scholarship. He found, however, that he came out largely empty handed. “Our schools have come to the point,” he says, “where we understand and embrace many learning styles. A teacher may use nine different math strategies, ten different reading strategies…but we typically rely on just one strategy of motivation: reward and punishment. They just don’t do the job.”

Just what is the answer? To his amazement, Lavoie stumbled across an unlikely source of “practical, pragmatic, and detailed” research: from Madison Avenue advertising! “If anybody knows how to motivate kids,” says Lavoie, “it’s the people selling toys and music.” They understand, explains Lavoie, that “one size does not fit all.” Kids—and we adults—respond to different kinds of motivating drives.

To help load kids’ “batteries,” then, Lavoie argues that we must be willing to understand what drives them—as well as what drives us. If we’re different, we must be ready to bridge those gaps.

So, parents, do you know what motivates you and your child the most? Check out Lavoie’s list and see what matches (note: more than one may apply!):

Gregariousness

These folks adore social interaction and love to be in a lively crowd. Gregarious folks love to be connected to others, and hate to feel cast out in any way. When they’re comfortable, they’re friendly and may be great at both joining and leading.

View Full Article
Add your own comment

This Weeks Deals

FREE Shipping on Orders over $50