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5 Ways to Make Potty Training a Success (page 2)

5 Ways to Make Potty Training a Success

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Updated on Apr 17, 2014

3. Develop a Routine

In the beginning, your toddler probably won’t tell you when she has to potty. So schedule regular bathroom breaks throughout the day. Put your child on the potty every hour, and shortly after she has something to drink. Also, watch for signs that your child has to potty such as squatting, suddenly stopping during play, or grunting to have a bowel movement. To help your toddler relax while she’s sitting on the potty, read a story, sing a tune, or talk to her. And don’t flip out when she has accidents in her clothes – toilet training takes time, and accidents are all part of the learning process.

4. Use Motivators

Rewards can serve as huge motivators for youngsters. Weekly sticker charts will get your child excited about using the restroom. Sticker charts can be easily made at home, printed from various websites, or purchased from discount and school supply stores. Every time your child uses the potty, praise her, and let her put a sticker on the chart. Once the chart is filled with stickers, reward your toddler with an inexpensive treat such as a coloring book, a trip to the park, or an ice cream cone.

5. Be Consistent

Potty training a toddler requires a tremendous amount of consistency. And distractions in the home such as a new addition to the family, a pending divorce, or a death of a loved one can interfere with your ability to be consistent with potty training. So if there is something going on in your life that will prevent you from providing a regular toilet training rhythm for your toddler, put the task on hold until things settle down.

If you’ve been trying consistently for three to four months to potty train your child and haven’t had any luck, or if she isn’t showing signs of readiness by the time she’s 3, talk to your pediatrician.

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