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8 Places to Submit a Project After the Science Fair

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Updated on Mar 25, 2013

After spending weeks and weeks on the perfect science fair project, the last thing your young scholar wants to do is throw it in the trash. Luckily, she doesn’t have to. Instead of a one-and-done day of sciencey fun, prolong the contest by entering her science fair project in one of these events.

Canada Wide Virtual Science Fair

Despite its name, the Canada Wide Virtual Science Fair accepts submissions from all over the world. Students in kindergarten to 12th grade can enter either individually or as a team. The submissions take the form of websites that the competitors put together to explain their projects. Your child will need a teacher to sponsor her entry, but the teacher doesn’t have to be involved beyond registration.

The DuPont Challenge

The DuPont Challenge might require a little extra work, but it could be a lot of fun for your 7th to 12th grade scientist. Instead of submitting the actual project, the DuPont Challenge is looking for a scientific essay that explores food, protection, innovation or energy. If your child’s science fair project is about one of these issues, it might be worthwhile for her to write 700 to 1,000 words explaining what she did.

Google Science Fair

Google started its virtual science fair in 2011 and it has since grown into one of the largest online science contests in the world. The event is open to students 13 to 18 years old from around the globe. Entries are accepted in 13 languages. With its worldwide reach, the Google Science Fair is super competitive, but can still be a fun venture for your future scientist. Winners of this fair can earn a $50,000 scholarship or an explorative trip sponsored by National Geographic.

Iditarod Science Fair

This science fair is pretty specialized, but it could be a great fit for your Iditarod-loving child. If her science fair project is related to the Alaskan dogsled race, then she can enter it into the Iditarod Science Fair. They’re still working on the details for the 2013 event, but you can see last year’s winning entry here for some insight.

International Virtual Science Fair

This virtual science fair is hosted by Super Science Fair Projects and is open to students from around the world in kindergarten through college. If your child enters, then she’ll get a T-shirt and certificate. If she wins, then she’ll get some cool age-appropriate science gear.  

Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision Competition

The ExploraVision Competition is all about innovation in technology. If your young one invented a unique piece of cool technology, then this is the contest for her. Entries are accepted from students under 21 throughout the United States and Canada.

Young Scientist Challenge

3M’s Young Scientist Challenge is another contest perfect for your junior innovator. If your child’s science fair project identified an everyday problem and proposed a solution, then she just needs to submit a short video explaining it. Within one or two minutes, your kiddo could be on her way to winning a video camera, cash or the chance to work with a 3M scientist mentor.

National Organizations

There are a ton of national organizations that sponsor science fairs. All you have to do is find the one that relates to your child’s background or interests. Here are just a few of the organizations that host virtual science fairs for students around the country.

National Association of Black Engineers

National Association of Independent Schools

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Each contest accepts different types of submissions; some want a video while others require web pages and written documents. But considering how much work your child has already put into the science fair, it’s well worth the effort to continue encouraging and inspiring your young Einstein well beyond science fair season.

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