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PepeKaliwete
PepeKaliwete asks:
Q:

My 11 year old ADHD son has an IQ of 128. Should I keep him in the Special Ed Program or get him out?

We knew something wasn't right when he was 4 yrs old. He kept getting in trouble at the daycare with the other kids and the caregivers. By the 2nd grade, he was falling behind academically and was diagnosed with ADHD. He was then put on the Special Education Program. The school psychologist gave him the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children - version IV (WISC-IV) in which he scored 126 so we knew he had the mental capacity to learn. (In the 5th grade, he was given the same test and scored 128). Initially, we were hesistant to put him on meds. I've read so many horror stories about the side effects so we started with natural remedies and supplements. A couple of months of it and still no noticeable improvements so we started him on meds. After several months of trial and error, it was Focalin that saved the day. All the benefits of the others meds without the side effects. My question is this. Should I keep him in the Special Ed Program or get him out? We're afraid that the stigma tied with being a "Special Ed" kid might hurt him in the future, not to mention the social and emotional implications he'd have to deal with. He's more than caught up academically as he finished the 5th grade on the A/B Honor Roll. He was in all regular classes and did not have the need to use any of the special accomodations put in place for him. Will it be better for him at this point to get him out of the Special Ed Program and put him in the 504 Plan instead or just let him be mainstream? Thnx
In Topics: ADHD & attention issues
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Wayne Yankus
Jun 15, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

good for you for following through with your son.  he will be the better for it.  By law, he is entitled to a 504 designation and most boys with ADHD find it helpful at some time. It is there for him but he does not have to use the acommodations if he doesn't need them.  Going mainstream could place him out of the IEP which he may need for middle school. Ask your principal about what is best in the system for him to succeed and what have other families done and succeeded.  good luck and stay and advocate.

Wayne Yankus, MD,FAAP
expert panelist: pediatrics

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