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MrsWilliams2010
MrsWilliams... asks:
Q:

16 Month Old not saying a lot of words

My soon to be 17 month old doesn't say many words.  She seems to understand us when we speak to her and tell her to do something, but just doesn't verbalize.   She only says a few words (ma, dada, bye-bye) and thats all we've really heard her say.  Now she does slack a little physically because she has a brachial plexus injury to her right arm, so I'm wondering with her traumatic birth, if this may have a part in her developmental delay with speaking.  Any insights?  Also, she does see an OT and a PT so I'm going to inquire with them as well if this is something that needs to be evaluated.  TIA
In Topics: My child's growth and development, Speech and language issues
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Dr.Monika
Jan 13, 2012
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What the Expert Says:

By age 18 months, a child should be able to say at least 5 words.  Do you read to your child everyday?  Do you talk?  If you don't, start reading everyday.  See how that affects your child's speech.  If your daughter does not start to pick up new words within a month, you should talk with her regular health care provider who might suggest a hearing evaluation.

Suggested reading:

Language milestones
http://www.pluggedinparents.com/component/content/article/221

Best regards.
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Additional Answers (1)

CFeitzinger0911
CFeitzinger... writes:
Dear Mrs. Williams2010
I have been in your shoes.  At 18 months our little girl could hardly say a word.  She said words like dadda, momma, and could manage to say a few other sounds.  She mainly would point and grunt at the items she wanted.  She was strong minded and would push and point until we understood.  She also would grab at the side of her mouth and cry when it became extremely difficult for her to handle the lack of communication.  We did have her tested and she required speech and physical therapy.  I can not tell you what caused it but I can tell you that facing it made it so much easier to start the healing.  She is now 5 years old and she still requires speech therapy 2x a week for about 30 minutes a class.  She is strong and her speech is so much clearer and her confidence is amazing.  We have always told her that our adversaties make us strong and prepare us for the roads ahead.  We also found sign language as a great way to help fill in the gaps during the beginning of speech.  Our daughters tantrums and frustration dropped so much just by having the ability to communicate a few words like more, eat, drink, milk, mom, dad, hurt, mad.  I suggest a sign language video from baby einsteins.  I hope this helps.
> 60 days ago

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