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worriedMUM
worriedMUM asks:
Q:

17 month old doesn't talk much. Should I be worried by this?

Hi everyone,
my 17m.old boy is not talking much. He knows to say a few words(like dogs name,bye,hi and give), my child care nurse thinks that he should know to say about 6-20 clear words by now. Apart form that he is pretty good with social skills(enjoys playing with other kids,like to share toys and food),know to ride a bike,to get on and off the couch/ furniture, he is also very loving and gives us a lot of cuddles. We are using two languages at home and im not sure can this be a problem?
He is just starting to be interested in books and videos for kids.
He is also in family day care four days a week and lady that looks after him doesn't think he has any developmental problems.
My CC nurse thinks that speech therapy might help. When did your child start to talk? and should i be worried by this?
In Topics: My child's growth and development, Speech and language issues
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Wayne Yankus
Apr 22, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

We set off the worry flags for boys at about two years old.  Remember, if he has language (understands you and follows instructions) he will have speech.  In bilingual homes, it will take longer.  If he can swallow and chew well and no longer uses a pacifier or  bottle, it should progress.  Your sitter is correct that most will verbalize to 20 words, but each child is different. Speak to your pediatrician and ask her what she thinks at his 18month visit.

Wayne Yankus, MD, FAAP
expert panelist: pediatrics
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Additional Answers (4)

Dr.Monika
Dr.Monika , Child Professional writes:
Children develop at their own pace.  Generally speaking boys tend to be a little slower than girls in achieving milestone, but they catch up fairly quickly.  As long as kids develop with the normal parameters, there is no need for concern.

A 17-months-old toddler should be able to say clearly at least 3 words, and your child knows 4.  To boost his vocabulary acquisition, read to him daily, allow him time to say what he wants to express, and by the time he is 2 years old, he should have at least 50 words and be able to put them together!

Suggested reading:

Developmental milestones 12 to 18 months

http://www.pluggedinparents.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=141&Itemid=0

Best regards.
> 60 days ago

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NancyMM
NancyMM writes:
I do know that kids learning 2 languages take longer to talk. I learned in a bilingual home and my mom told me I wasn't speaking well until I was around 4-5 years old. Just keep an eye on it and if they believe he should do some form of speech therapy then go for it. It can only help him in the end. Follow your instint you know your child.

I have 3 boys and I had my first son evaluated and he was fine. My second son was evaluated and he is in speech therapy now. My third son is 15m and he only knows Dadda.
> 60 days ago

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Dr.Teresa
Dr.Teresa , Child Professional writes:
Dear Worried Mum,

I am a speech-language pathologist and child development specialist. Your child care nurse is almost on target. I would like to see a 17 month old with nearly 15 words, putting some two-word utterances together, making simple requests, and trying to talk more than using gestures.

Books are great. Encourage those and spend time naming the items for him.

I strongly discourage tv and videos, especially at this age. They negatively effect the brain and in this important developmental time we want good positive stimuli and interactions.

If you and your nurse are concerned that is significant sign. You may want to consider having him evaluated by a speech-language pathologist (also called a speech therapist). Speech-language pathologists are trained experts in child cognitive and speech-motor development and can tell you if your son is on target.

If there is a problem, early detection and intervention is very important. The longer you wait, the more difficulty improving skills become.

Services are provide free from Early Intervention Agencies for children under three years of age and from local departments of education for children ages three years and up.


Best of luck,
Teresa Signorelli, PhD, CCC/SLP
www.myspeechdoctor.com

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HappyLearner
HappyLearner writes:
I WOULD NOT implement speech therapy just yet. Children,as you know, develop in different areas at different rates. I have five children. My two girls developed in the speech department "on schedule". All three of my boys were delayed in their speech until two-and-a-half to three years old. The oldest boy speaks very clearly as an adult, but he was speaking as well as other kids by four or five. My second oldest wasn't speaking well in kindergarten, so he was given speech therapy. After we moved he couldn't continue his speech therapy as regularly, and he really needed more of it.

This one is now an adult and is hard to understand over the phone. If you had just met him you'd say he speaks just fine, but I notice how his words are kinda "mush-mouthed". He still has a hard time with 'r'.

You really can't tell that early. I'd wait untill he's at least two to judge his speech.

Have you had his hearing tested? Make sure his hearing is normal first, because this obviously effects speech development.
> 60 days ago

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