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tonyagheen
tonyagheen asks:
Q:

How can we help a 1st grader with dyslexia become a better reader.

In Topics: Helping my child with reading, Dyslexia, Special needs
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Louiseasl
Aug 4, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

Hello and thank you for writing to JustAsk!

Children who are of first grade age often make letter and number reversals.  To help train their eyes and give them practice try these fun strategies:

1. Chalk on the sidewalk.  Use this fun way to write names of common objects and simple math problems.

2. Writing on a cookie tray filled with pudding or whip cream.  Helping to trace or outline letters, words and numbers with a finger full of fun food will help by using a kinesthetic approach!

3.  Playdoh or clay helps a child to feel and see the formation of letters.

Enjoy!

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Additional Answers (2)

Mella1
Mella1 writes:
I was diagnosed with dyslexia in second grade...the things that helped me the most were patience from my parents/teachers and colored clear sheet that i placed over all of my reading material. If your child is tired, frustrated, or not feeling well they will be more likely to transpose letters, numbers, and words too...
> 60 days ago

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debblen4
debblen4 writes:
Hi,
I'm a primary school teacher.  I teach 23 students aged 5 -7 yrs old.  I believe that 8 of my students have dyslexic symptoms and 5 have dyscalculia symptoms.  

Davis, the founder of the Davis Dyslexia Association, believes that dyslexia is actually a way of thinking and processing, not a disability, that dyslexics are picture thinkers, not word thinkers and therefore process everything differently.  The 'disability' comes into play as the education system has been created by 'word' thinkers and so confuses the picture thinker.  
The Davis course teaches a dyslexic adult/child how to recognise when they are confused and how to remove that confusion.  

I have been diagnosed with dyslexia, dyscalculia & also have struggled with co-ordination & depth perception.  Although I had the classic symptoms of dyslexia all my life, I was only identified at uni.  At school I was identified as an 'above average' student, working approximately 2 - 3 years ahead of my peers, except in maths and spelling.  A year ago I completed a literacy course with a Davis Dyslexia Facilitator.  I have noticed that since completing the reading / writing programme I no longer require coloured lens (for reading and driving) and I no longer have 'shadows' dance over the page when I read.  I now have great balance and haven't had an accident or fallen over in a year (my balance was awful and I used to fall over often or sprain my ankles).   My spacial awareness is correct - now when I drive I know that the 2 lines are not going to merge together and no longer feel that I might crash off a cliff.  I can accurately predict the time (my sense of time use to speed up or slow down depending on what I was doing).  Since completing the maths programme this year my mental maths is great and my spelling has improved.  My handwriting looks great now and I can write straight across a page without needing lines.  My speech has improved and I no longer stutter.  I should add, I was classified as a mild dyslexic :)  

As a teacher I am familiar with a wide range of programmes.  I would like recommend that you read "The Gift of Dyslexia" and "The Gift of Learning" by Ronald. D. Davis.  My mum home-educates my youngest 2 siblings.  When she read the first book, my youngest brother had got to the stage of hating reading.  He used to cry and get panicky at the thought of reading.  She followed the instructions in the first book and now he is an amazing confident reader, who is working at the same level as other children his age.  

Don't give up on your child.  As a teacher I have found that my most creative children are also my most dyslexic students.  Be encouraged that your child is capable of great things, he / she is NOT disabled but simply learns differently from other child.  I wish you and your child success.
> 60 days ago

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