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mauve
mauve asks:
Q:

hi,i would like 2 know how 2 make learning of sight words easy?for example=giraffe

In Topics: Helping my child with reading
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Candace_Lindemann
Jun 19, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

Sight words are words that your child should recognize on sight (without sounding out) to increase reading fluency. Sight words depend on your child's age and reading ability, but usually begin with the most common words, such as "the".

Fluency makes reading easier, quicker, and more enjoyable.

I like this list of how to make learning sight words fun:
http://www.ehow.com/how_2196319_learning-sight-words-fun.html

I often use the collage technique for literacy skills--it is a great visual representation and helps a child recognize the same letters or words in many different contexts, fonts, and sizes.

You'll notice many of these techniques are "hands on" and/or highly visual.

For more on sight words, check out these articles on Education.com:
http://www.education.com/reference/article/define-assess-sight-vocabulary
http://www.education.com/reference/article/develop-word-recognition

---
Candace Lindemann, Ed.M. - JustAsk Expert
Educational Consultant and Writer
http://CandaceLindemann.com
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Additional Answers (7)

RJhinnu
RJhinnu writes:
Hi mauve, itâs great that you are taking the time to find ways to make learning sight words easier for children. One suggestion that I have is to play different games with children that include learning sight words that are appropriate for their age and grade level. One game is called Word Checkers; you can check it out by linking on through the URL provided. I have also provided another link in case you would also like to learn more information on how to determine your student or childâs sight vocabulary fits their grade level. Good luck!

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Louiseasl
Louiseasl , Child Professional writes:
I have many parents tell me that they pair reading with the use of sign language and pictures. Sight words can come "alive" when paired with either the sign for the word or the fingerspelling of the word ( sign language alphabet)  

For more info about sign language feel free to peruse our website at www.signingfamilies.com
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
Make it multisensory.  You can use the following techniques.

1.   Air Spelling:  Choose a word.  With their finger, students spell the word in the air and say the letters aloud.  Tell students they must be able to "see" the letters as they are written in the air.  When the students get to the last letter, they underline the whole word as they say the word aloud.  Ask them if they can "see" the word in the air.  After their response, ask these type of questions:
- what is the third letter? - what is the last letter? - can you spell it backwards?  Remind the student that the word should be floating in the air in front of them and that they must continue to look at it throughout the activity.

2.  Stairsteps:  Write the words as if they are stairs, adding one letter each time.
S
SP
SPE
SPEL
SPELL

3.  Rainbow Words:  Student writes a word with his/her pencil.  Then traces around the outside with a crayon, hugging the same but not touching the letters.  Student can then pick two other crayons to continue tracing outward.

If a student has a learning disability, such as dyslexia and/or ADHD they must learn in a multisensory way.  Multisensory means using all of your learning modalities.  See it, Say it, Hear it, Move with it.
> 60 days ago

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BruceDeitrickPrice
BruceDeitri... , Teacher writes:
And why are you so sure you should use sight-words????

All the experts I trust say phonics is the only way to go.

This YouTube video is one of six about reading. See More From BruceDeitrickPrice.

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beem80
beem80 writes:
Hello,

I would like to share this website with you.  Go www.readingeggs.com.  It is the best reading program.  They have everything that your child need to learns.  Please go check it out.

Good luck.
> 60 days ago

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dev1999
dev1999 writes:
I'm Dyslexic and typing always helped me.
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
1.  PING PONG THROW:  Get a bunch of ping pong balls.  On each ping pong ball write the sight word in black sharpie.  Give you child the balls and play "throw __ to me.  Throw ___ to me.  Super fun and great for the active learner.

2. HIDDEN SPELLING WORDS: On a white piece of paper let your child write out the words using a white crayon.  Once all the words have been written, use watercolors and paint to make hidden words appear!

3.  WORD PUZZLE SCAVENGER HUNT: Write words onto constrution paper and cut apart letters.  Put letters in plastic eggs or other such container and hide around the room.   Have child find words you've hidden and put words together correctly like a word puzzle.  Super fun!

4.  BOUNCE BALL: Bounce a ball as you spell each letter in the word.  1 bounce per letter.

5.  CHEERLEADER CHANT:  Give ma a S, give me a P, give me an E, give me an L, give me a L - what's that spell?  SPELL

6.  SIGHT WORD HOPSCOTCH: Get those kids playing, moving and learning!  Make a hopscotch diagram with chalk outside on a piece of concrete.  Write each word in one of the squares.  And have child read the words out loud as they hop on the word.
> 60 days ago

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