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aguerreroviruete
aguerrerovi... asks:
Q:

How can you make a 2 year old talk?

In Topics: Preschool
> 60 days ago

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KLWebb
KLWebb writes:
HOW CAN YOU MAKE A 2-YEAR OLD TALK?
A two year-old child can tickle your funny bone one minute and exasperate you beyond measure in the next!  Although parents and caregivers exercise much control over children at this young age, we do not have the ability to âmake them talkâ.  There are, however, strategies you can employ that may reduce your frustration and that of your toddlerâs.  
An important element of fostering your childâs speech and language development includes talking to her throughout your day.  Describe what you are doing, where you are going, how objects and activities in your environment look, taste, feel, and sound.  Imitate the siren of the ambulance as you encounter a fire truck or ambulance in traffic.  As you answer the doorbell, you can say, âI hear the doorbell.  Letâs go see who it is.â  In this simple activity, you are engaging your toddler and teaching her at the same time by pointing out the meaning of the sound of a doorbell.  
Children typically use gestures to indicate their wants and needs before they learn to talk.  Of course you will want to respond to your child but before you satisfy his needs, be certain to model the name of what it is he is requesting with his actions or gestures.  Get at eye level with him so he can see what the word(s) look like on your mouth.  Repeat the word and then give the child the requested item, e.g. drink, book, outside, etc.  He may not be ready to imitate you, but the short amount of time required to model a word for your child will pay handsomely in due time.  
If your child is demonstrating frustration, consider introducing early manual signs.  The internet offers numerous websites which illustrate the mechanics of forming individual signs.  Toddlers frequently utilize signs as a bridge to verbal communication.  Use of signs is a well-researched strategy for modeling language for toddlers who are not yet ready to imitate or use words.  
If your child has not developed a vocabulary of at least 50 words by 18-24 months of age, consult your pediatrician and request a referral for a speech and language evaluation.  

By Ann Gray, MS CCC-SLP (Speech Language Pathologist)
> 60 days ago

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TeacherandParent
TeacherandP... writes:
You really can't make a 2 year old talk. You can encourage them to speak and can encourage them to learn words and to try to say words.

Nature did not intend every child to be talking at age 2. Children learn to talk at different ages. Babies start to babble, between 1 and 2 children say 'da-da' and 'ma-ma'. Between 2 and 3 children can develop more words.

One common way to develop children's speech is actually with animal sounds - 'how does the cow go' - moo - what does the cat say? - meow. Children find 'moo' and the meow sound easier than words. Another way to foster speech in very young children is to read aloud from simple books. Certainly talking to children helps them to learn speech. Singing simple songs with them - 'row, row, row your boat' etc. , twinkle, twinkle little star' - those simple songs sung to children help them to learn words.

Some people believe if you refuse to give a child his bottle until he asks for it that that will make the child talk. A child who just points is not ready to talk yet. Children want to speak. The statement 'he's too lazy to talk' is a old wives' tale. Nature has a plan for every child and what we can do is help children along by talking to them, singing to them, reading to them and playing word games with them. Hold up a book with animal pictures and say "let's point to the horse!" and give lots of praise when he does.
> 60 days ago

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Wayne Yankus
Wayne Yankus writes:
Be sure your child can hear.  If he was tested in the hospital at birth and the results were "pass" you may still need a more sophisticated test.  Speak with your pediatrician.  Otherwise, you have received good advice on this site.

Wayne Yankus, MD, FAAP
expert panelist: pediatrics
> 60 days ago

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