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yas88
yas88 asks:
Q:

My 4 years old son, has Asperger's. I'm in needs of tips to help him with his behaviours and not hurting his little brother. Please HELP!

I just found out my son has Asperger's a couple of days ago. This was and is very shocking to me, because my boys are my life, they are the oxygen I need to live. I need help, I need a guide, support, someone to tell me he is going to be OK.
In Topics: Special needs, Autism & Aspergers Syndrome, Motherhood
> 60 days ago

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Expert

lkauffman
Dec 9, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

I imagine this is a very difficult, upsetting time for you. It can be quite a blow to learn that your child has special needs that require additional support. It is not uncommon for parents to spend some time "mourning" the fact that their child is, and will be, different than they had always imagined. Be accepting of these thoughts and feelings; they are real, valid, and you are not alone.

The good news is that there is a growing understanding of Asperger Syndrome and more and more information is making its way to parents. At Education.com, we partnered with the Autism Society to synthesize some of the latest research and advice on Asperger Syndrome to parents in an easy to digest manner. To see the latest information on this topic, click here: http://www.education.com/special-edition/aspergers/.

Also, there are a number of books about parenting a child with Asperger Syndrome that may be of interest to you. I particularly like Paula Jacobsen's book: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1843108046/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_2?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=1843107430&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1TYSTYKGQ9YM0EDXHAQD.

I would also encourage you to reach out and learn about services and accommodations available in your community. I wasn't sure if your son was diagnosed by the school district or an outside provider. Either way, you should ask the professional for recommendations for services and providers. You can also reach out to your local Autism Society chapter- http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=community_chapters to find other parents in your area.


Good luck and stay strong. Many children with Asperger Syndrome go on to live happy and healthy productive lives!

Warm regards,

Laura Kauffman, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Education.com JustAsk Expert
http://www.drlaurakauffman.com/

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Additional Answers (3)

Dr.Monika
Dr.Monika , Child Professional writes:
The diagnosis of Asperger's can be a shock to a parent.  However, the diagnosis itself only puts a name on behaviors that have emerged over time.  Your son still is and will be your "oxygen", but by having a diagnosis you can tailor his treatment to assure that he can reach his full potential.  Your child's health care provider will be your guide, so don't be afraid to ask him or her any questions.

Suggested readings on Asperger's Syndrome:

Web MD

http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/tc/aspergers-syndrome-symptoms

Kids Health

http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/brain/asperger.html

Mayo Clinic

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/aspergers-syndrome/DS00551

Best regards.
> 60 days ago

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Jennifur
Jennifur , Teacher, Parent writes:
Diagnosis is a blessing. You will find many resources available to you know. Talk with your local school system. They typically start them earlier than other kids to help with some of the challenges and make the school transition a bit earlier. Social Stories using his topic of interest with the moral of the story being the social rule have worked well for me and my boys (oldest w/ Asperger's and a neurotypical little brother). Relax! Start teaching him social rules, just like you would any other child. You will just be teaching many more rules (the ones that others pick up on naturally). Be patient! He will likely not transition what you taught to the next scenario unless it is identical to the one you taught him in. Teach him to adapt rules to similar situations (or at least ask if he should). Boys will be Boys! Remember that they are more physical, wrestle, fight, move, fall, do stupid things just because they have a Y chromosome. Give him a little leeway for gender (mentally.....you still need to consistently enforce the social rules). Be consistent with enforcement of social rules (even when you are exhausted) boys do get easier with time. Even our AS guys. Kids are resilient. They are not China, and although we freak out when they may get hurt.....that is what 911 and the ER are for. Do your best and most of all enjoy! Find the humor in every situation, smile at the quirks, and just do your best. You are not alone!

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hummingbird26
hummingbird26 writes:
If it was my child I would go to the end of the world and back to find something that sparks his interest it could be math to animal he may just be bored with his mind and don't now how to use that energy his mind can do wonderful thing he has to learn how to use his gifts
> 60 days ago

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