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malone.steph
malone.steph asks:
Q:

My 6 year old cannot verbally tell you his letters.  If you ask him to show you a "G" he can, but to tell you that letter is a "G" he cannot always do

In Topics: Helping my child with reading
> 60 days ago

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qwas
qwas writes:
I did not understand what you worte
> 60 days ago

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dwaa
dwaa writes:
Does he also do that with other "known" daily items? Like simple vocabulary that he encounters; for example, umbrella, zebra, etc?
There may be some sort of recall issue or expressive language delay. A speech eval to check for expressive language concerns may be helpful.
> 60 days ago

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mill71201
mill71201 writes:
I 'taught the sounds' to my daughter (7) and she still has to think of letter names and still sometimes cannot remember what they are called but can write it.
> 60 days ago

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Zsazsa
Zsazsa writes:
I think you are worried that he doesn't know the phonetic sounds connected to each of the alphabet letters.

For example, if you ask him to point to the letter G, he can point it out to you but if you ask him to tell you the sound that the 'G' makes, he is not able to do so.

        'g' can say 'guh' as in gorilla or 'g' can also say 'juh' as in giant

Why not have your child make a simple alphabet scrapbook with a page for every letter. On each page, have your child cut out pictures that begin with all the letters from the alphabet (from magazines, computer clip art, or have him draw pictures) and glue the pictures on the appropriate pages.

e.g.,  On the 'Aa' page, use pictures of ambulance, apple, astronaut, alligator, etc). 'Bb' use pics of ball, banjo, baseball, balloon, etc.

It will take several days/weeks to assemble all this if you don't want to overwhelm him with the project (the best way to turn a child off learning/trying when they're already struggling with concepts).

Once you've got a page prepared, review the letter (both uppercase and lowercase formations) and the sound/sounds that are heard at the beginning of picture on the page.

You don't have to have all 26 pages completed to begin practicing and reviewing the letters' sounds.

Remember that some letters have more than one phonetic sound attached to them. ( like 'c' can have a 'k' sound like in cat or a 's' sound like in cereal).

It would also be helpful to use one color to print the consonants at the top of each page and a different color to print all of the vowels in the alphabet (a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y).  Just remember, a long vowel name says its name and a short vowel sound is different.
 
   long 'a' says 'a' as in apron and short 'a' says 'ah' as in apple

You could also print the word under each picture and have your child underline the first letter in each word to reinforce his understanding of the letter/phonetic sound.
> 60 days ago

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lynellen
lynellen writes:
I have seen several children who could point to the letter "G" and tell me the sound of the letter "G" but could not recall the actual name.  One would find the alphabet strip and start at A naming each letter by singing until he came to "G".  Please have your child evaluated by a speech and language therapist who can identify exactly what is happening when he tries to recall a letter name. There are so many ways to help your son!
> 60 days ago

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